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COLORADO POTATO BEETLE CONTROL, 2011

COLORADO POTATO BEETLE CONTROL, 2011 Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.E46 (E46) POTATO: Solanum tuberosum L., ‘Atlantic’ Adam M. Byrne Michigan State University 243 Natural Science Building East Lansing, MI 48824 Phone: 517-432-0900 Fax: (517) 353-4354 E-mail: byrnea@msu.edu Zsofia Szendrei E-mail: szendrei@msu.edu Colorado potato beetle: Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) Colorado potato beetle is the most important insect pest of potatoes worldwide. Feeding by the adults and larvae can lead to serious foliar damage that can limit both plant growth and yield. Seventeen insecticide treatments and an untreated check (Table 1) were tested for their control of Colorado potato beetle at the MSU Montcalm Research Center, near Entrican, MI. Potatoes (variety ‘Atlantic’) were planted 12 inches apart, with 34 inch row spacing on 12 May 2011. Treatments were replicated four times in a RCB design. Plots were 40 ft long and three rows wide with untreated guard rows bordering each plot. A16901, Admire Pro, Brigadier 2SC, and Platinum 75 SG treatments were applied as in-furrow sprays at planting. One Brigadier treatment also required a second application at hilling, which was made by applying a narrow band to the soil on 14 Jun. Foliar treatments were first applied at greater than 50% Colorado potato beetle egg hatch on 16 Jun. Based on the economic threshold of more than one large larvae per plant, additional first generation sprays were needed for Blackhawk (6 Jul), Endigo ZC (6 Jul), the two low rates of HGW86 10 OD (29 Jun), Leverage 360 (6 Jul), and Provado (29 Jun & 6 Jul). All applications were made using a single-nozzle hand-held boom (30 gpa and 30 psi). Post-spray counts of first generation Colorado potato beetle st nd rd th adults, small larvae (1 and 2 instars), and large larvae (3 and 4 instars) of five randomly selected plants from the middle row of each plot were made weekly, starting on 21 Jun. Plots were visually rated for defoliation weekly by estimating total defoliation per plot. The numbers of small larvae, large larvae, and adults, as well as the defoliation ratings, were transformed (log + 1) prior to analysis. ANOVA was used for data analysis and ad-hoc Tukey means separation was used to compare treatment means (P < 0.05). All treatments significantly reduced the number of large larvae per plant, compared to the untreated check (Table 1). There were also significant differences in numbers of large larvae among the insecticide treatments. Admire Pro and Provado 1.6 F were some of the poorer performing products. Brigadier 2SC (a product containing bifenthrin and imidacloprid), performed as well as most other treatments when applied in-furrow, but when low rates were applied in-furrow and then at hilling, eight other insecticide treatments had significantly fewer large larvae per plant. Except for Provado, all treatments resulted in significantly fewer small larvae than the untreated check. The untreated plots had significantly greater defoliation compared to all other treatments. The seasonal defoliation average was 51.9% in the untreated plots, compared to less than 6% for all other treatments. Differences in defoliation among insecticide treated plots ranged from 0.6 to 5.4%. Neonicotinoid insecticides are still providing sufficient Colorado potato beetle control for Michigan farmers, but new chemical classes such as HGW86 10 OD and Tolfenpyrad 15 EC are also proving to be effective. This research was supported by industry gifts of pesticide and research funding. 1 Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.E46 Table 1. Seasonal mean Seasonal mean Treatment/ Rate-amt Application Seasonal mean no. small no. large Seasonal mean formulation product/acre dates no. adults/plant larvae/plant larvae/plant % defoliation Untreated check -- -- 0.6abc 6.1e 5.5e 51.9f HGW86 10 OD 3.37 fl oz 16 & 29 Jun 0.2ab 1.5abc 1.5ab 1.1abc HGW86 10 OD 6.75 fl oz 16 & 29 Jun 0.4abc 1.4abcd 0.0a 0.9abc HGW86 10 OD 10.1 fl oz 16 Jun 0.3abc 1.6bcd 0.3abc 1.6abcde Provado 1.6 F 3.8 fl oz 16 & 29 Jun, 6 Jul 0.3abc 2.9de 1.1d 2.6bcde Blackhawk 3.2 oz 16 Jun, 6 Jul 0.3abc 2.4bcd 0.8bcd 4.8de Endigo ZC 3 oz 16 Jun, 6 Jul 0.2ab 3.0cd 0.6abcd 2.1abcde Leverage 360 2.8 oz 16 Jun, 6 Jul 0.3abc 3.0cd 0.6abcd 2.6bcde Tolfenpyrad 15 EC 14 fl oz 16 Jun 0.3abc 1.1abcd 0.6abcd 3.0bcde Tolfenpyrad 15 EC 21 fl oz 16 Jun 0.1a 3.1cd 1.2d 2.1bcde Admire Pro 8.7 fl oz 12 May 0.4abc 0.9ab 0.8cd 2.0bcd Platinum 75 SG 1.68 oz 12 May 0.6bc 0.2ab 0.1abc 0.9ab Platinum 75 SG 2.66 oz 12 May 0.2ab 0.3a 0.1ab 0.6a A16901 6.5 oz 12 May 0.6c 0.4ab 0.1ab 5.4cde A16901 10 oz 12 May 0.3abc 0.3a 0.1ab 0.9abcde Brigadier 2SC 25.6 oz 12 May 0.3abc 0.8abc 0.6abcd 1.9abcde Brigadier 2SC 38.4 oz 12 May 0.4abc 0.7abc 0.2abc 1.3abcd Brigadier 2SC 12.8 oz 12 May, 14 Jun 0.3ab 1.5abcd 1.2d 4.5e Means within columns not followed by the same letter are significantly different (Tukeys HSD; p=0.05) Applied with Dyne-Amic at 0.5% vol/vol. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

COLORADO POTATO BEETLE CONTROL, 2011

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Abstract

Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.E46 (E46) POTATO: Solanum tuberosum L., ‘Atlantic’ Adam M. Byrne Michigan State University 243 Natural Science Building East Lansing, MI 48824 Phone: 517-432-0900 Fax: (517) 353-4354 E-mail: byrnea@msu.edu Zsofia Szendrei E-mail: szendrei@msu.edu Colorado potato beetle: Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) Colorado potato beetle is the most important insect pest of potatoes worldwide. Feeding by the adults and larvae can lead to serious foliar damage that can limit both plant growth and yield. Seventeen insecticide treatments and an untreated check (Table 1) were tested for their control of Colorado potato beetle at the MSU Montcalm Research Center, near Entrican, MI. Potatoes (variety ‘Atlantic’) were planted 12 inches apart, with 34 inch row spacing on 12 May 2011. Treatments were replicated four times in a RCB design. Plots were 40 ft long and three rows wide with untreated guard rows bordering each plot. A16901, Admire Pro, Brigadier 2SC, and Platinum 75 SG treatments were applied as in-furrow sprays at planting. One Brigadier treatment also required a second application at hilling, which was made by applying a narrow band to the soil on 14 Jun. Foliar treatments were first applied at greater than 50% Colorado potato beetle egg hatch on 16 Jun. Based on the economic threshold of more than one large larvae per plant, additional first generation sprays were needed for Blackhawk (6 Jul), Endigo ZC (6 Jul), the two low rates of HGW86 10 OD (29 Jun), Leverage 360 (6 Jul), and Provado (29 Jun & 6 Jul). All applications were made using a single-nozzle hand-held boom (30 gpa and 30 psi). Post-spray counts of first generation Colorado potato beetle st nd rd th adults, small larvae (1 and 2 instars), and large larvae (3 and 4 instars) of five randomly selected plants from the middle row of each plot were made weekly, starting on 21 Jun. Plots were visually rated for defoliation weekly by estimating total defoliation per plot. The numbers of small larvae, large larvae, and adults, as well as the defoliation ratings, were transformed (log + 1) prior to analysis. ANOVA was used for data analysis and ad-hoc Tukey means separation was used to compare treatment means (P < 0.05). All treatments significantly reduced the number of large larvae per plant, compared to the untreated check (Table 1). There were also significant differences in numbers of large larvae among the insecticide treatments. Admire Pro and Provado 1.6 F were some of the poorer performing products. Brigadier 2SC (a product containing bifenthrin and imidacloprid), performed as well as most other treatments when applied in-furrow, but when low rates were applied in-furrow and then at hilling, eight other insecticide treatments had significantly fewer large larvae per plant. Except for Provado, all treatments resulted in significantly fewer small larvae than the untreated check. The untreated plots had significantly greater defoliation compared to all other treatments. The seasonal defoliation average was 51.9% in the untreated plots, compared to less than 6% for all other treatments. Differences in defoliation among insecticide treated plots ranged from 0.6 to 5.4%. Neonicotinoid insecticides are still providing sufficient Colorado potato beetle control for Michigan farmers, but new chemical classes such as HGW86 10 OD and Tolfenpyrad 15 EC are also proving to be effective. This research was supported by industry gifts of pesticide and research funding. 1 Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.E46 Table 1. Seasonal mean Seasonal mean Treatment/ Rate-amt Application Seasonal mean no. small no. large Seasonal mean formulation product/acre dates no. adults/plant larvae/plant larvae/plant % defoliation Untreated check -- -- 0.6abc 6.1e 5.5e 51.9f HGW86 10 OD 3.37 fl oz 16 & 29 Jun 0.2ab 1.5abc 1.5ab 1.1abc HGW86 10 OD 6.75 fl oz 16 & 29 Jun 0.4abc 1.4abcd 0.0a 0.9abc HGW86 10 OD 10.1 fl oz 16 Jun 0.3abc 1.6bcd 0.3abc 1.6abcde Provado 1.6 F 3.8 fl oz 16 & 29 Jun, 6 Jul 0.3abc 2.9de 1.1d 2.6bcde Blackhawk 3.2 oz 16 Jun, 6 Jul 0.3abc 2.4bcd 0.8bcd 4.8de Endigo ZC 3 oz 16 Jun, 6 Jul 0.2ab 3.0cd 0.6abcd 2.1abcde Leverage 360 2.8 oz 16 Jun, 6 Jul 0.3abc 3.0cd 0.6abcd 2.6bcde Tolfenpyrad 15 EC 14 fl oz 16 Jun 0.3abc 1.1abcd 0.6abcd 3.0bcde Tolfenpyrad 15 EC 21 fl oz 16 Jun 0.1a 3.1cd 1.2d 2.1bcde Admire Pro 8.7 fl oz 12 May 0.4abc 0.9ab 0.8cd 2.0bcd Platinum 75 SG 1.68 oz 12 May 0.6bc 0.2ab 0.1abc 0.9ab Platinum 75 SG 2.66 oz 12 May 0.2ab 0.3a 0.1ab 0.6a A16901 6.5 oz 12 May 0.6c 0.4ab 0.1ab 5.4cde A16901 10 oz 12 May 0.3abc 0.3a 0.1ab 0.9abcde Brigadier 2SC 25.6 oz 12 May 0.3abc 0.8abc 0.6abcd 1.9abcde Brigadier 2SC 38.4 oz 12 May 0.4abc 0.7abc 0.2abc 1.3abcd Brigadier 2SC 12.8 oz 12 May, 14 Jun 0.3ab 1.5abcd 1.2d 4.5e Means within columns not followed by the same letter are significantly different (Tukeys HSD; p=0.05) Applied with Dyne-Amic at 0.5% vol/vol.

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Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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