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Swinburne

Swinburne 384 / VICTORIAN POETRY MARGOT K. LOUIS In the past year Swinburne's voice has been heard freshly in a new collection of his letters and a new selection of his poetry and prose; at the same time, various critics have explored his exploitation and transformation of earlier works (poems by Villon, Milton, Baudelaire, Tennyson, and Swinburne himself), as well as the ways in which he influenced texts by later writers like H.D. and T. S. Eliot. As students of Swinburne look ahead to his centenary in 2009, it seems that a fresh perception of his place in literary history is in rapid formation. The appearance of Uncollected Letters of Algernon Charles Swinburne, edited and splendidly annotated by Terry L. Meyers (Pickering and Chatto, 2005), should substantially forward such a reassessment. Rikky Rooksby has reviewed Uncollected Letters fully (and glowingly) in a previous issue of VP, and I shall review it in detail shortly in JPRS; so I shall touch here only on a few salient points. These three volumes might have been entitled "Swinburne and his Contexts"; more than half of the work consists of letters from Swinburne (four-fifths of which have not previously been published anywhere), and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Victorian Poetry West Virginia University Press

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 West Virginia University.
ISSN
1530-7190
Publisher site
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Abstract

384 / VICTORIAN POETRY MARGOT K. LOUIS In the past year Swinburne's voice has been heard freshly in a new collection of his letters and a new selection of his poetry and prose; at the same time, various critics have explored his exploitation and transformation of earlier works (poems by Villon, Milton, Baudelaire, Tennyson, and Swinburne himself), as well as the ways in which he influenced texts by later writers like H.D. and T. S. Eliot. As students of Swinburne look ahead to his centenary in 2009, it seems that a fresh perception of his place in literary history is in rapid formation. The appearance of Uncollected Letters of Algernon Charles Swinburne, edited and splendidly annotated by Terry L. Meyers (Pickering and Chatto, 2005), should substantially forward such a reassessment. Rikky Rooksby has reviewed Uncollected Letters fully (and glowingly) in a previous issue of VP, and I shall review it in detail shortly in JPRS; so I shall touch here only on a few salient points. These three volumes might have been entitled "Swinburne and his Contexts"; more than half of the work consists of letters from Swinburne (four-fifths of which have not previously been published anywhere), and

Journal

Victorian PoetryWest Virginia University Press

Published: Sep 11, 2005

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