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Bumble Bees of the Western United States by Jonathan Koch, James Strange, Paul Williams (review)

Bumble Bees of the Western United States by Jonathan Koch, James Strange, Paul Williams (review) BOOK REVIEW Bumble Bees of the Western United States Jonathan Koch, James Strange, and Paul Williams A product of the USDA Forest Service and the Pollinator Partnership with funding from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. 2012. 144 p. To obtain this publication, visit the Pollinator Partnership at http://www.pollinator.org/books. Downloadable page versions are available through the USDA Forest Service at http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/ pollinators/documents/BumbleBeeGuide2011.pdf or at http://www.pollinator.org/books. In 2007, the National Resource Council released its report Status of Pollinators in North America. Specific status information of many groups, such as most native bee species, are lacking long-term data. The Council found sufficient evidence, however, that overall, pollinators in North America are experiencing population decline; and in particular, several North American bumble bees (Bombus sp.). Franklin's bumble bee (Bombus franklini), currently being reviewed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, may be among the first bee species to receive protection under the Endangered Species Act. Numerous other bumble bee species have declined in abundance and range across North America. The foreword written for this book clearly emphasizes the value of collaborators, including citizen scientists, providing location information for scientists who are studying bumble bee populations and status in an effort to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Native Plants Journal University of Wisconsin Press

Bumble Bees of the Western United States by Jonathan Koch, James Strange, Paul Williams (review)

Native Plants Journal , Volume 14 (2) – Aug 29, 2013

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © Native Plants Journal Inc.
ISSN
1548-4785
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEW Bumble Bees of the Western United States Jonathan Koch, James Strange, and Paul Williams A product of the USDA Forest Service and the Pollinator Partnership with funding from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. 2012. 144 p. To obtain this publication, visit the Pollinator Partnership at http://www.pollinator.org/books. Downloadable page versions are available through the USDA Forest Service at http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/ pollinators/documents/BumbleBeeGuide2011.pdf or at http://www.pollinator.org/books. In 2007, the National Resource Council released its report Status of Pollinators in North America. Specific status information of many groups, such as most native bee species, are lacking long-term data. The Council found sufficient evidence, however, that overall, pollinators in North America are experiencing population decline; and in particular, several North American bumble bees (Bombus sp.). Franklin's bumble bee (Bombus franklini), currently being reviewed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, may be among the first bee species to receive protection under the Endangered Species Act. Numerous other bumble bee species have declined in abundance and range across North America. The foreword written for this book clearly emphasizes the value of collaborators, including citizen scientists, providing location information for scientists who are studying bumble bee populations and status in an effort to

Journal

Native Plants JournalUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 29, 2013

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