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Winfield Scott and the Profession of Arms (review)

Winfield Scott and the Profession of Arms (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2007) creative book, advance historical understanding of colonial natural history in ways that specialists have demanded but not pursued, and will force them to rethink the categories they employ. But potential readers should be aware that this is not a book to be referenced quickly, a go-to for a lecture anecdote. Parrish's study and arguments are rich, detailed, and complicated, but evocative. It might disappoint the skimmer, but it will reward the patient individual who can luxuriate in a world we know so little about. An drew J. L ewi s is an assistant professor of history at American University. Winfield Scott and the Profession of Arms. By Allan Peskin. (Kent, OH: The Kent State University Press, 2003. Pp. 328. Cloth, $49.00.) Reviewed by Charles D. Grear The first half of the nineteenth century was a crucial time in the development in the United States military. During this time, the country's military became professional through a succession of events: the establishment of the United States Military Academy at West Point, a victory against the British in the War of 1812, expansion of territory by removing Indians west of the Mississippi River, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Winfield Scott and the Profession of Arms (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 27 (1) – Feb 23, 2007

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2007) creative book, advance historical understanding of colonial natural history in ways that specialists have demanded but not pursued, and will force them to rethink the categories they employ. But potential readers should be aware that this is not a book to be referenced quickly, a go-to for a lecture anecdote. Parrish's study and arguments are rich, detailed, and complicated, but evocative. It might disappoint the skimmer, but it will reward the patient individual who can luxuriate in a world we know so little about. An drew J. L ewi s is an assistant professor of history at American University. Winfield Scott and the Profession of Arms. By Allan Peskin. (Kent, OH: The Kent State University Press, 2003. Pp. 328. Cloth, $49.00.) Reviewed by Charles D. Grear The first half of the nineteenth century was a crucial time in the development in the United States military. During this time, the country's military became professional through a succession of events: the establishment of the United States Military Academy at West Point, a victory against the British in the War of 1812, expansion of territory by removing Indians west of the Mississippi River, the

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 23, 2007

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