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U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825-1861 (review)

U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825-1861 (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2005) U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825­1861. By Etsuko Taketani. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2003. Pp. x, 236. Illustrations. Cloth, $30.00.) In a project directed toward students of American literary history, Etsuko Taketani has engaged the interstices among several different areas of inquiry in her study of women writers--predominantly of New England--and their writings both on and of colonialism during the early republic. As literary history, Taketani's study follows in a line of scholarship on women writers fostered primarily by Nina Baym (in Woman's Fiction: A Guide to Novels by and about Women in America, 1820­1870 [1978, 1993]; Feminism and American Literary History [1992]; and American Women Writers and the Work of History, 1790­1860 [1995]) but also by Mary Suzanne Schriber (in Writing Home: American Women Abroad, 1830­1920 [1997]) and Malini Johar Schueller (U.S. Orientalisms: Race, Nation, and Gender in Literature, 1790­1890 [1998]). As historical theoretical inquiry and postcolonial critique, the study works out a space to explore ambivalences and uncertainties regarding imperialist gestures left somewhat unexamined by scholars such as John Carlos Rowe (in Literary Culture and U.S. Imperialism: From the Revolution to World War II [2000] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825-1861 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 25 (3) – Oct 17, 2005

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2005) U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825­1861. By Etsuko Taketani. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2003. Pp. x, 236. Illustrations. Cloth, $30.00.) In a project directed toward students of American literary history, Etsuko Taketani has engaged the interstices among several different areas of inquiry in her study of women writers--predominantly of New England--and their writings both on and of colonialism during the early republic. As literary history, Taketani's study follows in a line of scholarship on women writers fostered primarily by Nina Baym (in Woman's Fiction: A Guide to Novels by and about Women in America, 1820­1870 [1978, 1993]; Feminism and American Literary History [1992]; and American Women Writers and the Work of History, 1790­1860 [1995]) but also by Mary Suzanne Schriber (in Writing Home: American Women Abroad, 1830­1920 [1997]) and Malini Johar Schueller (U.S. Orientalisms: Race, Nation, and Gender in Literature, 1790­1890 [1998]). As historical theoretical inquiry and postcolonial critique, the study works out a space to explore ambivalences and uncertainties regarding imperialist gestures left somewhat unexamined by scholars such as John Carlos Rowe (in Literary Culture and U.S. Imperialism: From the Revolution to World War II [2000]

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 17, 2005

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