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True Women and Westward Expansion, and: Changing National Identities at the Frontier: Texas and New Mexico, 1800-1850 (review)

True Women and Westward Expansion, and: Changing National Identities at the Frontier: Texas and... and families. But surely too, in being put to such good uses, they often felt sadly and sorely used. St ephe n Be rr y is assistant professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. He is the author of All That Makes a Man: Love and Ambition in the Civil War South (2003). True Women and Westward Expansion. By Adrienne Caughfield. (College Station, TX: Texas A & M University Press, 2005. Pp. xii, 178. Cloth, $32.95.) Changing National Identities at the Frontier: Texas and New Mexico, ´ ´ 1800­1850. By Andres Resendez. (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Pp. xiii, 309. Illustrations. Paper, $23.99.) As Anglo-American settlers migrated to the area that encompasses present-day Texas and New Mexico during the early nineteenth century, they came into contact with Hispanics, Tejanos, and Native Americans. These encounters led many Americans, New Mexicans, Native Americans, and Tejanos to redefine their respective national or ethnic identities ´ ´ in an effort to serve their respective interests. In Andres Resendez's Changing National Identities at the Frontier, the author maintains that anticolonial movements, civil wars, intertribal alliances, and land ventures molded the national and ethnic character of the inhabitants of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

True Women and Westward Expansion, and: Changing National Identities at the Frontier: Texas and New Mexico, 1800-1850 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 26 (3)

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

and families. But surely too, in being put to such good uses, they often felt sadly and sorely used. St ephe n Be rr y is assistant professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. He is the author of All That Makes a Man: Love and Ambition in the Civil War South (2003). True Women and Westward Expansion. By Adrienne Caughfield. (College Station, TX: Texas A & M University Press, 2005. Pp. xii, 178. Cloth, $32.95.) Changing National Identities at the Frontier: Texas and New Mexico, ´ ´ 1800­1850. By Andres Resendez. (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Pp. xiii, 309. Illustrations. Paper, $23.99.) As Anglo-American settlers migrated to the area that encompasses present-day Texas and New Mexico during the early nineteenth century, they came into contact with Hispanics, Tejanos, and Native Americans. These encounters led many Americans, New Mexicans, Native Americans, and Tejanos to redefine their respective national or ethnic identities ´ ´ in an effort to serve their respective interests. In Andres Resendez's Changing National Identities at the Frontier, the author maintains that anticolonial movements, civil wars, intertribal alliances, and land ventures molded the national and ethnic character of the inhabitants of

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

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