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Thomas Jefferson's Scrapbooks: Poems of Nation, Family & Romantic Love Collected by America's Third President (review)

Thomas Jefferson's Scrapbooks: Poems of Nation, Family & Romantic Love Collected by America's... REVIEWS bled foreign relations had a paramount influence on the election of 1800, but in Adams vs. Jefferson, Europe is mostly a backdrop. And more could have been done with the relationship of slavery, in 1800 and thereafter, to the election, especially considering that the balloting, as Ferling admits, revealed a growing split between northern and southern states. But Ferling perhaps misses his greatest opportunity in quoting in his epilogue (208) but failing to engage effectively Jefferson's familiar claim that the election of 1800 was ``as real a revolution in the principles of our government as that of 1776 was in its form'' (to Spencer Roane, September 6, 1819, in P. L. Ford's Writings of Thomas Jefferson, 12: 136). Following Joyce Appleby, he does endorse a general view of the democratic character of Jefferson's victory (209­10 and note 8), but declines to explore the arguments of more outspoken defenders of Jefferson's claim, such as Daniel Sisson in the 1970s and Jeffrey Pasley in the present decade. A healthy skepticism toward Jefferson's boast is hardly unwelcome to the present reviewer, who retains a keen admiration for President John Adams, if not for many of his ultra-Federalist colleagues. But Jefferson's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Thomas Jefferson's Scrapbooks: Poems of Nation, Family & Romantic Love Collected by America's Third President (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 27 (1) – Feb 23, 2007

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS bled foreign relations had a paramount influence on the election of 1800, but in Adams vs. Jefferson, Europe is mostly a backdrop. And more could have been done with the relationship of slavery, in 1800 and thereafter, to the election, especially considering that the balloting, as Ferling admits, revealed a growing split between northern and southern states. But Ferling perhaps misses his greatest opportunity in quoting in his epilogue (208) but failing to engage effectively Jefferson's familiar claim that the election of 1800 was ``as real a revolution in the principles of our government as that of 1776 was in its form'' (to Spencer Roane, September 6, 1819, in P. L. Ford's Writings of Thomas Jefferson, 12: 136). Following Joyce Appleby, he does endorse a general view of the democratic character of Jefferson's victory (209­10 and note 8), but declines to explore the arguments of more outspoken defenders of Jefferson's claim, such as Daniel Sisson in the 1970s and Jeffrey Pasley in the present decade. A healthy skepticism toward Jefferson's boast is hardly unwelcome to the present reviewer, who retains a keen admiration for President John Adams, if not for many of his ultra-Federalist colleagues. But Jefferson's

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 23, 2007

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