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Their Right to Speak: Women's Activism in the Indian and Slave Debates (review)

Their Right to Speak: Women's Activism in the Indian and Slave Debates (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2006) Revolution. To offer two examples: First, the gentility to which upperclass Americans aspired was predicated upon the market yet regulated the manner in which goods were obtained and consumed. Second, even today, many Americans prefer comfortable subsistence to profit maximization, the mentality described by James Henretta in his classic article ´ (``Families and Farms: Mentalite in Pre-Industrial America,'' William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 35, 1978: 3­32). Thus, the excellent work of Breen and Martin et al. causes us to question the very revolutions they posit: Except for quantitative leaps in consumption, perhaps we are dealing with an ongoing conflict between two sets of ideals, individualism and pursuit of wealth on the one hand, community and morality (or at least mores) on the other, ideals that contradicted and complemented each other as much in John Winthrop's 1630 ``City Upon a Hill Speech'' (be moral and prosper) as in our present capital-R Republican party's efforts to reconcile the very same ideals. Wi llia m Pe nca k, professor of history at Penn State, is completing a biography of Bishop William White, founder of the American Episcopal Church; his major long-term project is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Their Right to Speak: Women's Activism in the Indian and Slave Debates (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 26 (3)

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2006) Revolution. To offer two examples: First, the gentility to which upperclass Americans aspired was predicated upon the market yet regulated the manner in which goods were obtained and consumed. Second, even today, many Americans prefer comfortable subsistence to profit maximization, the mentality described by James Henretta in his classic article ´ (``Families and Farms: Mentalite in Pre-Industrial America,'' William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 35, 1978: 3­32). Thus, the excellent work of Breen and Martin et al. causes us to question the very revolutions they posit: Except for quantitative leaps in consumption, perhaps we are dealing with an ongoing conflict between two sets of ideals, individualism and pursuit of wealth on the one hand, community and morality (or at least mores) on the other, ideals that contradicted and complemented each other as much in John Winthrop's 1630 ``City Upon a Hill Speech'' (be moral and prosper) as in our present capital-R Republican party's efforts to reconcile the very same ideals. Wi llia m Pe nca k, professor of history at Penn State, is completing a biography of Bishop William White, founder of the American Episcopal Church; his major long-term project is

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

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