Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Fatigues of His Table: The Politics of Presidential Dining During the Jefferson Administration

The Fatigues of His Table: The Politics of Presidential Dining During the Jefferson Administration The Fatigues of His Table The Politics of Presidential Dining During the Jefferson Administration MERRY ELLEN SCOFIELD Thomas Jefferson gave dinner parties: pleasant, personable affairs with good food and imported wines. He gave them as master of Monticello, as a Virginian representative to the Second Continental Congress, as minister to France, as secretary of state, and, most decidedly, he gave them as president of the United States. Breaking away midafternoon from his writing desk, often clothed in the careless manner of Virginian aristocracy, Jefferson welcomed to the executive mansion an array of politicians, foreign ministers, and local gentry, guiding a dozen or more to the table, up to five times a week, during seven of the eight congressional seasons of his administration. Jefferson's presidential dinner records, now on deposit in Boston's Massachusetts Historical Society, begin with the opening day of the Second Session of the Eighth Congress and end two days after the inauguration of his successor, James Madison. On the first page, an anonymous annotation reads ``Supposed list of persons Entertained during T.J.'s 2d term,'' but the collection actually runs from November 5, 1804, through March 6, 1809, covering the last five years of Jefferson's eight-year administration. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Fatigues of His Table: The Politics of Presidential Dining During the Jefferson Administration

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 26 (3)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/the-fatigues-of-his-table-the-politics-of-presidential-dining-during-0RUgisD3dR
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Fatigues of His Table The Politics of Presidential Dining During the Jefferson Administration MERRY ELLEN SCOFIELD Thomas Jefferson gave dinner parties: pleasant, personable affairs with good food and imported wines. He gave them as master of Monticello, as a Virginian representative to the Second Continental Congress, as minister to France, as secretary of state, and, most decidedly, he gave them as president of the United States. Breaking away midafternoon from his writing desk, often clothed in the careless manner of Virginian aristocracy, Jefferson welcomed to the executive mansion an array of politicians, foreign ministers, and local gentry, guiding a dozen or more to the table, up to five times a week, during seven of the eight congressional seasons of his administration. Jefferson's presidential dinner records, now on deposit in Boston's Massachusetts Historical Society, begin with the opening day of the Second Session of the Eighth Congress and end two days after the inauguration of his successor, James Madison. On the first page, an anonymous annotation reads ``Supposed list of persons Entertained during T.J.'s 2d term,'' but the collection actually runs from November 5, 1804, through March 6, 1809, covering the last five years of Jefferson's eight-year administration.

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

There are no references for this article.