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Southern Single Blessedness: Unmarried Women in the Urban South, 1800-1865 (review)

Southern Single Blessedness: Unmarried Women in the Urban South, 1800-1865 (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2006) dates for public office. As Allgor cleverly puts it, ``In a twist on the separate spheres, women performed the `dirty work' of politics to ensure their husbands' political purity'' (126). Earman refutes the traditional interpretation of early Washington as a boring, primitive, undesirable environment for temporary residents including Congressmen, diplomats, and office seekers. On the contrary, Earman describes boardinghouse life as pleasant and politically intriguing. Congressmen (and often their wives and families) lodged and messed together based on their political persuasions and their geographical origins. The final chapter is less a conclusion to this volume than it is a conclusion to the series of which this book is a part. In it, Bowling endeavors ``to illustrate, by focusing on the Second Congress, the potential for further study of the Federalist Congresses'' (192). Reading this volume, one is struck by the virtual invisibility of John Adams, the president who oversaw removal and the incumbent in the election of 1800. Taken together, these essays offer a reminder of how many difficult challenges the Early American Republic faced at the turn of the century, including adjusting to the death of the country's leading citizen, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Southern Single Blessedness: Unmarried Women in the Urban South, 1800-1865 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 26 (3)

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2006) dates for public office. As Allgor cleverly puts it, ``In a twist on the separate spheres, women performed the `dirty work' of politics to ensure their husbands' political purity'' (126). Earman refutes the traditional interpretation of early Washington as a boring, primitive, undesirable environment for temporary residents including Congressmen, diplomats, and office seekers. On the contrary, Earman describes boardinghouse life as pleasant and politically intriguing. Congressmen (and often their wives and families) lodged and messed together based on their political persuasions and their geographical origins. The final chapter is less a conclusion to this volume than it is a conclusion to the series of which this book is a part. In it, Bowling endeavors ``to illustrate, by focusing on the Second Congress, the potential for further study of the Federalist Congresses'' (192). Reading this volume, one is struck by the virtual invisibility of John Adams, the president who oversaw removal and the incumbent in the election of 1800. Taken together, these essays offer a reminder of how many difficult challenges the Early American Republic faced at the turn of the century, including adjusting to the death of the country's leading citizen,

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

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