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Memory's Daughters: The Material Culture of Remembrance in Eighteenth-Century America (review)

Memory's Daughters: The Material Culture of Remembrance in Eighteenth-Century America (review) REVIEWS Memory's Daughters: The Material Culture of Remembrance in Eighteenth-Century America. By Susan Stabile. (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2004. Pp. xiii, 284. Illustrations. Cloth, $34.95.) Reviewed by Sarah Purcell Susan Stabile opens her book on a prominent group of Philadelphia women's practices of writing and remembering with an epigraph from Canto 3 of Byron's Don Juan: ``But words are things, and a small drop of ink/Falling like dew upon a thought'' (v). Much like the women she discusses, Stabile chose her epigraph carefully, for her insightful book seeks to treat words as ``things'' in order to unite the study of social and cultural history, literature, material culture, the history of the body, and the history of the book. Stabile uses diverse interdisciplinary methods to create a ``poetics of female memory'' to explain how her subjects created personal and collective memories in print and in practice in the latter part of the eighteenth century (12). In a study of the literary commonplace books exchanged by Elizabeth Fergusson, Hannah Griffitts, Deborah Logan, Annis Stockton, and Susanna Wright, she explores a whole host of ideas about memory, death, emotion, and philosophy, connecting them to material practices and conventions of architecture, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Memory's Daughters: The Material Culture of Remembrance in Eighteenth-Century America (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 27 (1) – Feb 23, 2007

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS Memory's Daughters: The Material Culture of Remembrance in Eighteenth-Century America. By Susan Stabile. (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2004. Pp. xiii, 284. Illustrations. Cloth, $34.95.) Reviewed by Sarah Purcell Susan Stabile opens her book on a prominent group of Philadelphia women's practices of writing and remembering with an epigraph from Canto 3 of Byron's Don Juan: ``But words are things, and a small drop of ink/Falling like dew upon a thought'' (v). Much like the women she discusses, Stabile chose her epigraph carefully, for her insightful book seeks to treat words as ``things'' in order to unite the study of social and cultural history, literature, material culture, the history of the body, and the history of the book. Stabile uses diverse interdisciplinary methods to create a ``poetics of female memory'' to explain how her subjects created personal and collective memories in print and in practice in the latter part of the eighteenth century (12). In a study of the literary commonplace books exchanged by Elizabeth Fergusson, Hannah Griffitts, Deborah Logan, Annis Stockton, and Susanna Wright, she explores a whole host of ideas about memory, death, emotion, and philosophy, connecting them to material practices and conventions of architecture,

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 23, 2007

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