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How Race Is Made: Slavery, Segregation, and the Senses (review)

How Race Is Made: Slavery, Segregation, and the Senses (review) REVIEWS establishes a clear relationship between local political conditions and play selection, and forces scholars to consider the theater's contributions to the construction of national identity before the 1790s. Shaffer also unearths a potentially significant finding in the well-mined field of republicanism. Although he does not draw this conclusion explicitly, his detailed description of play production throughout the colonial period suggests theater fostered the prominence of republican ideology. If Bernard Bailyn's ``intellectual switchboards'' allowed colonists to plug into republican ideology when periodically confronted by intrusive power grabbing, perhaps the constant republican patriotism exhibited in colonial theater functioned to keep the connection perpetually online. In this way, theater may have done more than just reflect political conditions. It may have helped shape them. This possibility represents one direction historians might take Shaffer's work. There are others, if only political historians will use theater history to the same degree Shaffer and other theater historians have employed political history. Ke nnet h Co hen is a Consortium Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania McNeil Center for Early American Studies and a PhD candidate in history at the University of Delaware. His forthcoming dissertation, `` `To Give Good Sport': The Economic Culture http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

How Race Is Made: Slavery, Segregation, and the Senses (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 28 (3) – Aug 3, 2008

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS establishes a clear relationship between local political conditions and play selection, and forces scholars to consider the theater's contributions to the construction of national identity before the 1790s. Shaffer also unearths a potentially significant finding in the well-mined field of republicanism. Although he does not draw this conclusion explicitly, his detailed description of play production throughout the colonial period suggests theater fostered the prominence of republican ideology. If Bernard Bailyn's ``intellectual switchboards'' allowed colonists to plug into republican ideology when periodically confronted by intrusive power grabbing, perhaps the constant republican patriotism exhibited in colonial theater functioned to keep the connection perpetually online. In this way, theater may have done more than just reflect political conditions. It may have helped shape them. This possibility represents one direction historians might take Shaffer's work. There are others, if only political historians will use theater history to the same degree Shaffer and other theater historians have employed political history. Ke nnet h Co hen is a Consortium Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania McNeil Center for Early American Studies and a PhD candidate in history at the University of Delaware. His forthcoming dissertation, `` `To Give Good Sport': The Economic Culture

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 3, 2008

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