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Enchanted Europe: Superstition, Reason, & Religion, 1250-1750 (review)

Enchanted Europe: Superstition, Reason, & Religion, 1250-1750 (review) Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft Summer 2012 ingen's stubborn legalism clashed with the rigorism of the lay judges in the village courts, who were most eager to use torture to get speedy confessions. Once more, Sauter demonstrates that the driving force of the persecutions were local courts run by lay judges who came under massive pressure from the so-called common men. The higher strata of the administration and the judiciary were comparatively skeptical. At least, they were not willing to bend the rules of due process, no matter if the country people thought they had caught a disciple of Satan. Unfortunately, Sauter does not realize the connection between state building and patterns of witch-hunting.2 The crowning piece of this most painstaking (if we may use the term in connection with a book on torture) study is the summary. A mere page and a half give the reader the very essence of the preceding 278 pages. This is a bold understatement but it works nevertheless. If you do not trust your German entirely, trust Sauter's style to guide you. She writes plainly and matter-of-factly, sometimes maybe verging on the brusque, but never dull. Sauter's book provides you with all the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft University of Pennsylvania Press

Enchanted Europe: Superstition, Reason, & Religion, 1250-1750 (review)

Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft , Volume 7 (1) – May 12, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
The University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1940-5111
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Abstract

Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft Summer 2012 ingen's stubborn legalism clashed with the rigorism of the lay judges in the village courts, who were most eager to use torture to get speedy confessions. Once more, Sauter demonstrates that the driving force of the persecutions were local courts run by lay judges who came under massive pressure from the so-called common men. The higher strata of the administration and the judiciary were comparatively skeptical. At least, they were not willing to bend the rules of due process, no matter if the country people thought they had caught a disciple of Satan. Unfortunately, Sauter does not realize the connection between state building and patterns of witch-hunting.2 The crowning piece of this most painstaking (if we may use the term in connection with a book on torture) study is the summary. A mere page and a half give the reader the very essence of the preceding 278 pages. This is a bold understatement but it works nevertheless. If you do not trust your German entirely, trust Sauter's style to guide you. She writes plainly and matter-of-factly, sometimes maybe verging on the brusque, but never dull. Sauter's book provides you with all the

Journal

Magic, Ritual, and WitchcraftUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 12, 2012

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