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American Taxation, American Slavery (review)

American Taxation, American Slavery (review) R EVIEWS EDITED BY ROBERT S. COX A N D R AC H E L K . O N U F American Taxation, American Slavery. By Robin L. Einhorn (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2006. Pp. xii, 337. Illustrations; maps. Cloth, $35.00.) Reviewed by Matthew Mason Robin Einhorn's new book is a valuable entry in the growing and muchneeded literature examining the exact impact that slavery had on the American state in the early republic--that is, on the actual workings and structure of the government, rather than on the better-researched political debates involving slavery. Unlike other recent treatments that stress the ways in which slaveholders dominated and used an expanding federal government to protect slavery, Einhorn takes a more traditional approach, arguing that slaveholders limited the power of the state--in this case to tax--to protect their peculiar institution.1 To say that this approach is traditional is not to say that Einhorn has written a hesitant monograph, or is content to present anew the common wisdom. Far from it. This book aims at nothing less than revising the central story that most Americans have accepted about the growth of the national state. Einhorn's attack on the traditional narrative http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

American Taxation, American Slavery (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 27 (1) – Feb 23, 2007

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

R EVIEWS EDITED BY ROBERT S. COX A N D R AC H E L K . O N U F American Taxation, American Slavery. By Robin L. Einhorn (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2006. Pp. xii, 337. Illustrations; maps. Cloth, $35.00.) Reviewed by Matthew Mason Robin Einhorn's new book is a valuable entry in the growing and muchneeded literature examining the exact impact that slavery had on the American state in the early republic--that is, on the actual workings and structure of the government, rather than on the better-researched political debates involving slavery. Unlike other recent treatments that stress the ways in which slaveholders dominated and used an expanding federal government to protect slavery, Einhorn takes a more traditional approach, arguing that slaveholders limited the power of the state--in this case to tax--to protect their peculiar institution.1 To say that this approach is traditional is not to say that Einhorn has written a hesitant monograph, or is content to present anew the common wisdom. Far from it. This book aims at nothing less than revising the central story that most Americans have accepted about the growth of the national state. Einhorn's attack on the traditional narrative

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 23, 2007

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