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Mr. Skylark: John Bennett and the Charleston Renaissance (review)

Mr. Skylark: John Bennett and the Charleston Renaissance (review) books Mr. Skylark John Bennett and the Charleston Renaissance By Harlan Greene University of Georgia Press, 2001 372 pp. Cloth $34.95 Reviewed by Dale Volberg Reed, coauthor of 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the South, published by Doubleday in 1996. Harlan Greene has set out to establish that John Bennett was a leading figure in the "Charleston Renaissance," and he brings impressive credentials and a missionary zeal to the project. Greene, a Charlestonian, novelist, and archivist, became fascinated with Bennett while cataloging thirty linear feet of his papers at the South Carolina Historical Society. It's easy to see why. Bennett was born in 1865, the son of a merchant in Chillicothe, Ohio. During several years of ill health as a child he read and drew avidly, and mastered the art of cutting silhouettes. Dropping out of high school, he worked for a newspaper, then went to Cincinnati to prepare for art school in New York until family business reverses forced him to return to newspaper work. Desperate to go to art school, he freelanced articles, stories, poems, illustrations, and silhouettes, and took any other odd jobs he could find. During these lean years, he developed depression, eyestrain, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Mr. Skylark: John Bennett and the Charleston Renaissance (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 9 (1)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

books Mr. Skylark John Bennett and the Charleston Renaissance By Harlan Greene University of Georgia Press, 2001 372 pp. Cloth $34.95 Reviewed by Dale Volberg Reed, coauthor of 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the South, published by Doubleday in 1996. Harlan Greene has set out to establish that John Bennett was a leading figure in the "Charleston Renaissance," and he brings impressive credentials and a missionary zeal to the project. Greene, a Charlestonian, novelist, and archivist, became fascinated with Bennett while cataloging thirty linear feet of his papers at the South Carolina Historical Society. It's easy to see why. Bennett was born in 1865, the son of a merchant in Chillicothe, Ohio. During several years of ill health as a child he read and drew avidly, and mastered the art of cutting silhouettes. Dropping out of high school, he worked for a newspaper, then went to Cincinnati to prepare for art school in New York until family business reverses forced him to return to newspaper work. Desperate to go to art school, he freelanced articles, stories, poems, illustrations, and silhouettes, and took any other odd jobs he could find. During these lean years, he developed depression, eyestrain,

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

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