Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

God’s Gluttons: Middle English Devotional Texts, Interiority, and Indulgence

God’s Gluttons: Middle English Devotional Texts, Interiority, and Indulgence Abstract: This article offers an analysis of the complex and contradictory nature of lay religious texts produced in England at the turn of the fifteenth century. These works are interesting because they include statements of both encouragement to and anxiety about lay Christians who pursue more singular forms of devotion. I focus on one text in particular, A Ladder of Foure Ronges by the Which Men Mowe Wele Clyme to Heven , a monastic treatise on contemplation translated into Middle English and adapted for a lay audience in the late fourteenth century, as a touchstone to consider these conflicting positions. His craving for alcohol was the equivalent on a low level of the spiritual thirst for wholeness, expressed in medieval language: the union with God. —Carl Jung, in a letter written in 1961 to Bill W., co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in Philology University of North Carolina Press

God’s Gluttons: Middle English Devotional Texts, Interiority, and Indulgence

Studies in Philology , Volume 110 (3) – Jul 19, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/god-s-gluttons-middle-english-devotional-texts-interiority-and-p6fi7pVWje
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1543-0383
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: This article offers an analysis of the complex and contradictory nature of lay religious texts produced in England at the turn of the fifteenth century. These works are interesting because they include statements of both encouragement to and anxiety about lay Christians who pursue more singular forms of devotion. I focus on one text in particular, A Ladder of Foure Ronges by the Which Men Mowe Wele Clyme to Heven , a monastic treatise on contemplation translated into Middle English and adapted for a lay audience in the late fourteenth century, as a touchstone to consider these conflicting positions. His craving for alcohol was the equivalent on a low level of the spiritual thirst for wholeness, expressed in medieval language: the union with God. —Carl Jung, in a letter written in 1961 to Bill W., co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous

Journal

Studies in PhilologyUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 19, 2013

There are no references for this article.