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Gentrification in the Revanchist Suburb: The Politics of Removal in Roswell, Georgia

Gentrification in the Revanchist Suburb: The Politics of Removal in Roswell, Georgia Abstract: Since the housing crisis of 2007–2009, suburban governments around Metropolitan Atlanta have increasingly partnered with real estate developers in attempts to revitalize disinvested suburban spaces. Many of these developments target working-class nonwhite communities located within municipalities predominated by affluent white homeowners, displacing some of the area’s most politically and socially marginalized residents. Examining the political processes surrounding one such project in Roswell, Georgia, we argue that in the wake of the Great Recession, it is likely that historically white, affluent, and reactionary suburbs confronted with changing socioeconomic and racial/ethnic landscapes will employ a revanchist politics to “take back” prime suburban spaces. Moreover, we argue that (sub) urban entrepreneurialism and New Urbanism are complementary and are fully compatible with revanchist (sub)urbanism. Rather than a progressive reversal of conventional suburban development, our analysis exposes this case of New Urbanism as the newest manifestation in a long-standing reactionary political project characteristic of this region. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southeastern Geographer University of North Carolina Press

Gentrification in the Revanchist Suburb: The Politics of Removal in Roswell, Georgia

Southeastern Geographer , Volume 56 (1) – Mar 18, 2016

Gentrification in the Revanchist Suburb: The Politics of Removal in Roswell, Georgia


The Politics of Removal in Roswell, Georgia SCOTT MARKLEY University of Tennessee Knoxville MAdhuRI ShARMA University of Tennessee Knoxville Since the housing crisis of 2007­2009, suburban governments around Metropolitan Atlanta have increasingly partnered with real estate developers in attempts to revitalize disinvested suburban spaces. Many of these developments target working-class nonwhite communities located within municipalities predominated by affluent white homeowners, displacing some of the area's most politically and socially marginalized residents. Examining the political processes surrounding one such project in Roswell, Georgia, we argue that in the wake of the Great Recession, it is likely that historically white, affluent, and reactionary suburbs confronted with changing socioeconomic and racial/ethnic landscapes will employ a revanchist politics to "take back" prime suburban spaces. Moreover, we argue that (sub) urban entrepreneurialism and New Urbanism are complementary and are fully compatible with revanchist (sub)urbanism. Rather than a progressive reversal of conventional suburban development, our analysis exposes this case of New Urbanism as the newest manifestation in a long-standing reactionary political project characteristic of this region. de revitalizar espacios suburbanos desinvertido. Muchos de estos desarrollos se dirigen a las comunidades no blancas de clase trabajadora ubicados dentro de los municipios predominado por los propietarios blancos ricos, desplazando a algunos de los residentes más política y socialmente marginadas de la zona. Examinamos los procesos políticos que rodean uno de esos proyectos en Roswell, Georgia, sostenemos que a raíz de la gran recesión, es probable que los suburbios históricamente blancos, ricos y reaccionarios que se enfrentan a cambios de paisajes socioeconómicos y raciales/étnicos emplearán una política...
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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Southeastern Division, Association of American Geographers.
ISSN
1549-6929
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Abstract

Abstract: Since the housing crisis of 2007–2009, suburban governments around Metropolitan Atlanta have increasingly partnered with real estate developers in attempts to revitalize disinvested suburban spaces. Many of these developments target working-class nonwhite communities located within municipalities predominated by affluent white homeowners, displacing some of the area’s most politically and socially marginalized residents. Examining the political processes surrounding one such project in Roswell, Georgia, we argue that in the wake of the Great Recession, it is likely that historically white, affluent, and reactionary suburbs confronted with changing socioeconomic and racial/ethnic landscapes will employ a revanchist politics to “take back” prime suburban spaces. Moreover, we argue that (sub) urban entrepreneurialism and New Urbanism are complementary and are fully compatible with revanchist (sub)urbanism. Rather than a progressive reversal of conventional suburban development, our analysis exposes this case of New Urbanism as the newest manifestation in a long-standing reactionary political project characteristic of this region.

Journal

Southeastern GeographerUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 18, 2016

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