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Carved in Stone The History of Stone Mountain (review)

Carved in Stone The History of Stone Mountain (review) Carved in Stone The History of Stone Mountain By David B. Freeman Mercer University Press, 1 997 200 pp. Cloth, $32.95 Reviewed by John M. Coski, historian at the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia. Coski is the author of Capital Navy: The Men, Ships, and Operations oftheJames River Squadron and contributed to A Woman's War: Southern Women, Civil War, and the Confederate Legacy. He has written and lectured widely on die Confederate memorial period and on the history and symbolism of the Confederate battle flag, including a photo essay for Southern Cultures. A heroic monument to the Confederacy first envisioned in 19 14 and finally dedicated in 1 970 presents an ideal opportunity to explore the Lost Cause in twentiethcentury America. Inexplicably, freelance historian David B. Freeman fails to seize this opportunity in his history of Stone Mountain, Georgia. Instead, Carved in Stone is a minimally interpretive narrative history of the granite monolith, the village, and the memorial known as Stone Mountain. The author's purpose is to write a definitive history -"to set the record straight" -- about the often controversial mountain. Based on research in official records and news- paper accounts and featuring fifty full-page http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Carved in Stone The History of Stone Mountain (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 4 (3) – Jan 4, 1998

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Carved in Stone The History of Stone Mountain By David B. Freeman Mercer University Press, 1 997 200 pp. Cloth, $32.95 Reviewed by John M. Coski, historian at the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia. Coski is the author of Capital Navy: The Men, Ships, and Operations oftheJames River Squadron and contributed to A Woman's War: Southern Women, Civil War, and the Confederate Legacy. He has written and lectured widely on die Confederate memorial period and on the history and symbolism of the Confederate battle flag, including a photo essay for Southern Cultures. A heroic monument to the Confederacy first envisioned in 19 14 and finally dedicated in 1 970 presents an ideal opportunity to explore the Lost Cause in twentiethcentury America. Inexplicably, freelance historian David B. Freeman fails to seize this opportunity in his history of Stone Mountain, Georgia. Instead, Carved in Stone is a minimally interpretive narrative history of the granite monolith, the village, and the memorial known as Stone Mountain. The author's purpose is to write a definitive history -"to set the record straight" -- about the often controversial mountain. Based on research in official records and news- paper accounts and featuring fifty full-page

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1998

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