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A Communion of the Spirits African-American Quilters, Preservers, and Their Stories (review)

A Communion of the Spirits African-American Quilters, Preservers, and Their Stories (review) speaking I am still a gloomy Georgia Presbyterian." And his comments on his contemporaries are equally interesting, particularly his assessment ofWilliam Styron's Sophie's Choice. He thought more highly of the novel than Foote, who labeled Styron's work "some of the absolutely worst writing Ive [sic] read in years." Indeed, Percy admired Styron for taking on the subject of the Holocaust-- and be- lieved he was an excellent writer. But Percy also felt Styron was a self-indulgent writer who substituted "excess and giganticism" for art: "Book as orgasm. Let it all hang out." Although the letters are often full of kidding and funning, sometimes Percy-- as in a letter written after he has learned that his prostate cancer has spread-- can be serious indeed. "I'll tell you what I've discovered," he writes Foote in July 1989. "Dying, if that's what it comes to, is no big thing since I'm ready for it, and prepared for it by the Catholic faith which I believe. What is a pain is not even the pain but the nuisance. It is a tremendous bother (and expense) to everyone. Worst of all is the indignity." Percy died nine months after writing that. His was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

A Communion of the Spirits African-American Quilters, Preservers, and Their Stories (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 3 (4) – Jan 4, 1997

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

speaking I am still a gloomy Georgia Presbyterian." And his comments on his contemporaries are equally interesting, particularly his assessment ofWilliam Styron's Sophie's Choice. He thought more highly of the novel than Foote, who labeled Styron's work "some of the absolutely worst writing Ive [sic] read in years." Indeed, Percy admired Styron for taking on the subject of the Holocaust-- and be- lieved he was an excellent writer. But Percy also felt Styron was a self-indulgent writer who substituted "excess and giganticism" for art: "Book as orgasm. Let it all hang out." Although the letters are often full of kidding and funning, sometimes Percy-- as in a letter written after he has learned that his prostate cancer has spread-- can be serious indeed. "I'll tell you what I've discovered," he writes Foote in July 1989. "Dying, if that's what it comes to, is no big thing since I'm ready for it, and prepared for it by the Catholic faith which I believe. What is a pain is not even the pain but the nuisance. It is a tremendous bother (and expense) to everyone. Worst of all is the indignity." Percy died nine months after writing that. His was

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1997

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