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The Transit of Empire: Indigenous Critiques of Colonialism by Jodi A. Byrd (review)

The Transit of Empire: Indigenous Critiques of Colonialism by Jodi A. Byrd (review) what extent is it possible to act within liberal institutional and discursive frames without perpetuating imperialism, racism, and social injustice? Are there other frames of action that are imaginable outside or alongside the individuated spaces of liberalism? Barker's analysis focuses on self-determination as process. In her argument, the key point is articulating versions of sovereignty that are rooted in and proceed from visions of social justice. She argues against purity in the process and, implicitly, against misplaced desires to retain or resurrect that purity. Instead, all choices and positions are "contaminated," so to speak, by the ordure of colonialism, which is why the vision and commitment to social justice is so vital when navigating the thickets of colonial power. Such attention to the rearticulations of colonial power through enactments and claims of Native sovereignty within federal law provides a window into thinking about the project of disarticulating the United States itself, and its own pretensions and claims to sovereignty, as a way station on the path to disarticulating Native selfdetermination from colonial recognition. Jodi A. Byrd. The Transit of Empire: Indigenous Critiques of Colonialism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2011. 336 pp. Paper, $25.00. Lisa King, University of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

The Transit of Empire: Indigenous Critiques of Colonialism by Jodi A. Byrd (review)

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 37 (1) – Jun 2, 2013

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

what extent is it possible to act within liberal institutional and discursive frames without perpetuating imperialism, racism, and social injustice? Are there other frames of action that are imaginable outside or alongside the individuated spaces of liberalism? Barker's analysis focuses on self-determination as process. In her argument, the key point is articulating versions of sovereignty that are rooted in and proceed from visions of social justice. She argues against purity in the process and, implicitly, against misplaced desires to retain or resurrect that purity. Instead, all choices and positions are "contaminated," so to speak, by the ordure of colonialism, which is why the vision and commitment to social justice is so vital when navigating the thickets of colonial power. Such attention to the rearticulations of colonial power through enactments and claims of Native sovereignty within federal law provides a window into thinking about the project of disarticulating the United States itself, and its own pretensions and claims to sovereignty, as a way station on the path to disarticulating Native selfdetermination from colonial recognition. Jodi A. Byrd. The Transit of Empire: Indigenous Critiques of Colonialism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2011. 336 pp. Paper, $25.00. Lisa King, University of

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 2, 2013

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