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The Militarization of Indian Country by Winona LaDuke with Sean Cruz (review)

The Militarization of Indian Country by Winona LaDuke with Sean Cruz (review) enous communities as "feminized passive indigeneity to masculine nationalist subjecthood" (358). Geidel's solution involves an activism free from gendered binaries as well as development ideologies. The contributors to Alternative Contact illustrate that much is still needed in current scholarship, particularly when analyzing transnational Indigenous perspectives. Each essay offers fodder for other scholars to build upon because of the variety of intriguing topics that achieve the editors' goals of crossing geographical and academic borders. Of particular interest is how the editors used the differences in their disciplines not only to explain the compartmentalization of academic specializations but also to motivate them to compile this volume. Alternative Contact, then, provides a refreshingly new approach to previous scholarship while it simultaneously offers scholars solid, well-researched analyses for further exploration of the transnational perspective. Winona LaDuke with Sean Cruz. The Militarization of Indian Country. Minneapolis mn: Honor the Earth Publications, 2011. 78 pp. Leola Tsinnajinnie, University of New Mexico Winona LaDuke (with Sean Cruz) recently added a new book, The Militarization of Indian Country, to the arsenal of words written to bring change to how Native communities are linked to military operations. The authors offer four chapters, which exhibit the militarization of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

The Militarization of Indian Country by Winona LaDuke with Sean Cruz (review)

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 37 (1) – Jun 2, 2013

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

enous communities as "feminized passive indigeneity to masculine nationalist subjecthood" (358). Geidel's solution involves an activism free from gendered binaries as well as development ideologies. The contributors to Alternative Contact illustrate that much is still needed in current scholarship, particularly when analyzing transnational Indigenous perspectives. Each essay offers fodder for other scholars to build upon because of the variety of intriguing topics that achieve the editors' goals of crossing geographical and academic borders. Of particular interest is how the editors used the differences in their disciplines not only to explain the compartmentalization of academic specializations but also to motivate them to compile this volume. Alternative Contact, then, provides a refreshingly new approach to previous scholarship while it simultaneously offers scholars solid, well-researched analyses for further exploration of the transnational perspective. Winona LaDuke with Sean Cruz. The Militarization of Indian Country. Minneapolis mn: Honor the Earth Publications, 2011. 78 pp. Leola Tsinnajinnie, University of New Mexico Winona LaDuke (with Sean Cruz) recently added a new book, The Militarization of Indian Country, to the arsenal of words written to bring change to how Native communities are linked to military operations. The authors offer four chapters, which exhibit the militarization of

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 2, 2013

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