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Reading Nelligan (review)

Reading Nelligan (review) plained by means of the subject's failings, anxieties, guilt or inadequacies. Yes, Chelebourg sticks to the itinerary that he traces in his introduction: examining violence and sexuality within the confines of the imaginaire of the writing subject. Unfortunately, this itinerary is too narrow. The study would benefit from casting a broader net and at least touching on other explanations of violence and sexuality in Mérimée's texts. Scott Carpenter, David Mickelsen and I have argued that Mérimée (historian, government employee and Senator) is certainly concerned by political and social currents in France. Could the violence in his texts be understood allegorically as references to the political and/or very real violence that afflicts France throughout the nineteenth century? And the disastrous relationships, the aberrant sexuality, could they not be understand on a broader level as well? Scott Sprenger has argued that the failed marriages in Mérimée's works can be seen as reflections of other ruptures in post-revolutionary France. Although he does not consider this recent scholarship, Chelebourg's study may be worth reading for those researching Mérimée who will find readings of many of the individual texts compelling and a short index will help researchers locate Chelebourg's analyses of specific texts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nineteenth Century French Studies University of Nebraska Press

Reading Nelligan (review)

Nineteenth Century French Studies , Volume 34 (1)

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1536-0172
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

plained by means of the subject's failings, anxieties, guilt or inadequacies. Yes, Chelebourg sticks to the itinerary that he traces in his introduction: examining violence and sexuality within the confines of the imaginaire of the writing subject. Unfortunately, this itinerary is too narrow. The study would benefit from casting a broader net and at least touching on other explanations of violence and sexuality in Mérimée's texts. Scott Carpenter, David Mickelsen and I have argued that Mérimée (historian, government employee and Senator) is certainly concerned by political and social currents in France. Could the violence in his texts be understood allegorically as references to the political and/or very real violence that afflicts France throughout the nineteenth century? And the disastrous relationships, the aberrant sexuality, could they not be understand on a broader level as well? Scott Sprenger has argued that the failed marriages in Mérimée's works can be seen as reflections of other ruptures in post-revolutionary France. Although he does not consider this recent scholarship, Chelebourg's study may be worth reading for those researching Mérimée who will find readings of many of the individual texts compelling and a short index will help researchers locate Chelebourg's analyses of specific texts.

Journal

Nineteenth Century French StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

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