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North Country: The Making of Minnesota by Mary Lethert Wingerd (review)

North Country: The Making of Minnesota by Mary Lethert Wingerd (review) pire" that smoothes over cacophony and the destruction of indigenous sovereignties the world over (189­90). Though often dense in language and sometimes seemingly fragmented in its choice of subjects for analysis, Byrd's accomplishment is bringing indigenous critical theory to bear on poststructural and postcolonial theorizing through a number of historical moments and literary texts and establishing how the transit of empire may be halted when we read the many voices affected by colonialism in relationship, not competition, with one another. In reading along the horizon of cacophony, Byrd reclaims indigenous intellectual and epistemological space in an act of theoretical decolonization that begins to "[restore] life and allows settler, arrivant, and native to apprehend and grieve together the violences of U.S. empire" (229). Mary Lethert Wingerd. North Country: The Making of Minnesota. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010. 248 pp. Cloth, $34.95. Neil McKay In North Country: The Making of Minnesota, Mary Lethert Wingerd has written a highly detailed account about how Mnisota Makoce (which in Dakota can mean "Land Where the Waters Reflect the Skies") became a territory and then a state. The format is chronological, from the early 1600s, with the fur trade, the struggle for power http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

North Country: The Making of Minnesota by Mary Lethert Wingerd (review)

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 37 (1) – Jun 2, 2013

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

pire" that smoothes over cacophony and the destruction of indigenous sovereignties the world over (189­90). Though often dense in language and sometimes seemingly fragmented in its choice of subjects for analysis, Byrd's accomplishment is bringing indigenous critical theory to bear on poststructural and postcolonial theorizing through a number of historical moments and literary texts and establishing how the transit of empire may be halted when we read the many voices affected by colonialism in relationship, not competition, with one another. In reading along the horizon of cacophony, Byrd reclaims indigenous intellectual and epistemological space in an act of theoretical decolonization that begins to "[restore] life and allows settler, arrivant, and native to apprehend and grieve together the violences of U.S. empire" (229). Mary Lethert Wingerd. North Country: The Making of Minnesota. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010. 248 pp. Cloth, $34.95. Neil McKay In North Country: The Making of Minnesota, Mary Lethert Wingerd has written a highly detailed account about how Mnisota Makoce (which in Dakota can mean "Land Where the Waters Reflect the Skies") became a territory and then a state. The format is chronological, from the early 1600s, with the fur trade, the struggle for power

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 2, 2013

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