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Native Acts: Law, Recognition, and Cultural Authenticity by Joanne Barker (review)

Native Acts: Law, Recognition, and Cultural Authenticity by Joanne Barker (review) very fair and evenhanded in the portrayal of the two sides, often disproving the often insensitive biases between the two factions. She develops a penetrating analysis of the burgeoning and explosive (both in growth and incisiveness) nature of racial shifting among Americans who consider themselves Cherokee. Although she calls racial shifting a narrative process of transformation and discusses its highly emotional nature, the emotional context and expression of the people she and her research assistant spoke with are largely absent, yet these could be very telling of the state that the subjects are in. The interviews Strum conducted personally demonstrate this better attention to the emotional state of her interlocutors much more than interviews conducted by her research assistant or the survey material. The latter often come off as more about the narrative than about the person telling the story and going through the drastic transformation. This is because Sturm is too far removed from those people. With so much attention to detail paid to the surrounding environment (the weather, physical environment, sounds, etc.), the book would have benefited from the same attention to the emotional responses to the questions and the conversations with her interlocutors. That said, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Native Acts: Law, Recognition, and Cultural Authenticity by Joanne Barker (review)

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 37 (1) – Jun 2, 2013

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

very fair and evenhanded in the portrayal of the two sides, often disproving the often insensitive biases between the two factions. She develops a penetrating analysis of the burgeoning and explosive (both in growth and incisiveness) nature of racial shifting among Americans who consider themselves Cherokee. Although she calls racial shifting a narrative process of transformation and discusses its highly emotional nature, the emotional context and expression of the people she and her research assistant spoke with are largely absent, yet these could be very telling of the state that the subjects are in. The interviews Strum conducted personally demonstrate this better attention to the emotional state of her interlocutors much more than interviews conducted by her research assistant or the survey material. The latter often come off as more about the narrative than about the person telling the story and going through the drastic transformation. This is because Sturm is too far removed from those people. With so much attention to detail paid to the surrounding environment (the weather, physical environment, sounds, etc.), the book would have benefited from the same attention to the emotional responses to the questions and the conversations with her interlocutors. That said,

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 2, 2013

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