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Indigenous Identity: What Is It and Who Really Has It?

Indigenous Identity: What Is It and Who Really Has It? Indigenous Identity What Is It, and Who Really Has It? hilary n. weaver Indigenous identity is a truly complex and somewhat controversial topic. There is little agreement on precisely what constitutes an indigenous identity, how to measure it, and who truly has it. Indeed, there is not even a consensus on appropriate terms. Are we talking about Indians, American Indians, Natives, Native Americans, indigenous people, or First Nations people? Are we talking about Sioux or Lakota? Navajo or Dine? Chippewa, Ojibway, or Anishnabe? Once we get that sorted out, are we talking about race, ethnicity, cultural identity, tribal identity, acculturation, enculturation, bicultural identity, multicultural identity, or some other form of identity? The topic of indigenous identity opens a Pandora's box of possibilities, and to try to address them all would mean doing justice to none. This article provides background information on three facets of identity--self-identification, community identification, and external identification--followed by a brief overview of measurement issues and my reflections on how internalized oppression/colonization is related to identity. The terms Native and indigenous are used interchangeably to refer to the descendants of the original inhabitants of North America. These are not, per se, the "right" terms or the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Indigenous Identity: What Is It and Who Really Has It?

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 25 (2) – Jun 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 The University of Nebraska.
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

Indigenous Identity What Is It, and Who Really Has It? hilary n. weaver Indigenous identity is a truly complex and somewhat controversial topic. There is little agreement on precisely what constitutes an indigenous identity, how to measure it, and who truly has it. Indeed, there is not even a consensus on appropriate terms. Are we talking about Indians, American Indians, Natives, Native Americans, indigenous people, or First Nations people? Are we talking about Sioux or Lakota? Navajo or Dine? Chippewa, Ojibway, or Anishnabe? Once we get that sorted out, are we talking about race, ethnicity, cultural identity, tribal identity, acculturation, enculturation, bicultural identity, multicultural identity, or some other form of identity? The topic of indigenous identity opens a Pandora's box of possibilities, and to try to address them all would mean doing justice to none. This article provides background information on three facets of identity--self-identification, community identification, and external identification--followed by a brief overview of measurement issues and my reflections on how internalized oppression/colonization is related to identity. The terms Native and indigenous are used interchangeably to refer to the descendants of the original inhabitants of North America. These are not, per se, the "right" terms or the

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 1, 2001

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