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Anita Loos: The Soubrette of Satire

Anita Loos: The Soubrette of Satire The Soubrette of Satire Anita Loos Anita Loos, courtesy of the George Eastman House Motion Picture Document Collection Work is more fun than fun. --Noël Coward F. Scott Fitzgerald became the spokesman of the 1920s, but it could have been Anita Loos if she had been game for the role. Her novel Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, a story of a beautiful gold-digger's antics, is just as evocative of the bathtub-gin era of American history as Fitzgerald's early work, This Side of Paradise. Perhaps the mantle went to Fitzgerald and not Loos because of her special affection for the demimonde--shady ladies, con men and charlatans all-around--rather than spritely flappers and their coiffed beaux of the Ivy League. Maybe it was the rakish company she kept--hustlers, tarnished ladies and the occasional con artist, along with Hollywood's working class of writers and actors. Or perhaps she was simply too old when the jazz age was ushered in; she was nearly forty when Blondes was published in 1925. When asked if she was a flapper, she characteristically replied, "The only thing I ever flapped was the pages of a yellow legal pad." Like Fitzgerald's, her first novel became an instant best seller, selling http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

Anita Loos: The Soubrette of Satire

The Missouri Review , Volume 37 (4) – Dec 19, 2014

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Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Soubrette of Satire Anita Loos Anita Loos, courtesy of the George Eastman House Motion Picture Document Collection Work is more fun than fun. --Noël Coward F. Scott Fitzgerald became the spokesman of the 1920s, but it could have been Anita Loos if she had been game for the role. Her novel Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, a story of a beautiful gold-digger's antics, is just as evocative of the bathtub-gin era of American history as Fitzgerald's early work, This Side of Paradise. Perhaps the mantle went to Fitzgerald and not Loos because of her special affection for the demimonde--shady ladies, con men and charlatans all-around--rather than spritely flappers and their coiffed beaux of the Ivy League. Maybe it was the rakish company she kept--hustlers, tarnished ladies and the occasional con artist, along with Hollywood's working class of writers and actors. Or perhaps she was simply too old when the jazz age was ushered in; she was nearly forty when Blondes was published in 1925. When asked if she was a flapper, she characteristically replied, "The only thing I ever flapped was the pages of a yellow legal pad." Like Fitzgerald's, her first novel became an instant best seller, selling

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Dec 19, 2014

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