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The Promise of Religious Naturalism (review)

The Promise of Religious Naturalism (review) womanist theologians and others interested in African American theology. let me suggest a number of lines of serious discussion. some may well question, including myself, whether process philosophy and theology, especially Whitehead's thought, are in anyway "postmodern," at least in the manner in which the term operates contemporaneously. Whitehead's physics is surely post-newtonian, but that is a long ways from being postmodern as described by thinkers such as lyotard, Jamison, said, et al. Where postmodernity signals the very death of any metaphysics at all, others might see coleman's postmodern interpretation of process thought at best as anachronistic or worse as a desperate attempt at rescue criticism for this metaphysical philosophy. still others, including myself, will commend coleman for suggesting that that there is a postmodern existential human need for metaphysical thinking, especially in a context where nihilism, violence, immediacy, and dead-end postliberal parochialisms cut off appeal to integrating theological claims and contemporary physics in the interest of fostering critical theologies of black religious experience. finally, much debate will surely center on what some might see as coleman's erasure of the distinctiveness of Christian theology of salvation. The claim that Jesus is not the center of salvation history but http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Theology & Philosophy University of Illinois Press

The Promise of Religious Naturalism (review)

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
2156-4795
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Abstract

womanist theologians and others interested in African American theology. let me suggest a number of lines of serious discussion. some may well question, including myself, whether process philosophy and theology, especially Whitehead's thought, are in anyway "postmodern," at least in the manner in which the term operates contemporaneously. Whitehead's physics is surely post-newtonian, but that is a long ways from being postmodern as described by thinkers such as lyotard, Jamison, said, et al. Where postmodernity signals the very death of any metaphysics at all, others might see coleman's postmodern interpretation of process thought at best as anachronistic or worse as a desperate attempt at rescue criticism for this metaphysical philosophy. still others, including myself, will commend coleman for suggesting that that there is a postmodern existential human need for metaphysical thinking, especially in a context where nihilism, violence, immediacy, and dead-end postliberal parochialisms cut off appeal to integrating theological claims and contemporary physics in the interest of fostering critical theologies of black religious experience. finally, much debate will surely center on what some might see as coleman's erasure of the distinctiveness of Christian theology of salvation. The claim that Jesus is not the center of salvation history but

Journal

American Journal of Theology & PhilosophyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Oct 26, 2011

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