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The “Never Ending Poem”: Some Remarks on Dombrowski’s Divine Beauty

The “Never Ending Poem”: Some Remarks on Dombrowski’s Divine Beauty Michael L. Raposa / Lehigh University I. ust about a decade ago, at the very beginning of what has proven now to be a staggeringly long midlife crisis, I wrote a little book about the religious significance of boredom. (I think of this as yin to the yang of more commonplace considerations of the religious significance of beauty.) That book concluded with a brief meditation on "waiting," in which I distinguished between waiting for meaning and the more proactively creative exercise of waiting on meaning. Daniel Dombrowski's splendid book on Charles Hartshorne's aesthetics is of the latter sort, a real service to meaning, both a careful attentiveness to meaning as it is embodied in Hartshorne's writing and the insightful extension of the latter's arguments in Dombrowski's own polished prose.1 I want to express my feelings of gratitude for Dombrowski's first rate hermeneutical achievement and indicate how delighted I am to be able to participate in a discussion of this book. Just about a century ago, near the end of what had proven to be a frustrating but brilliant philosophical career, Charles Peirce warned that all of our talk about God, about the divine nature and properties, was shrouded http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Theology & Philosophy University of Illinois Press

The “Never Ending Poem”: Some Remarks on Dombrowski’s Divine Beauty

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
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2156-4795
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Abstract

Michael L. Raposa / Lehigh University I. ust about a decade ago, at the very beginning of what has proven now to be a staggeringly long midlife crisis, I wrote a little book about the religious significance of boredom. (I think of this as yin to the yang of more commonplace considerations of the religious significance of beauty.) That book concluded with a brief meditation on "waiting," in which I distinguished between waiting for meaning and the more proactively creative exercise of waiting on meaning. Daniel Dombrowski's splendid book on Charles Hartshorne's aesthetics is of the latter sort, a real service to meaning, both a careful attentiveness to meaning as it is embodied in Hartshorne's writing and the insightful extension of the latter's arguments in Dombrowski's own polished prose.1 I want to express my feelings of gratitude for Dombrowski's first rate hermeneutical achievement and indicate how delighted I am to be able to participate in a discussion of this book. Just about a century ago, near the end of what had proven to be a frustrating but brilliant philosophical career, Charles Peirce warned that all of our talk about God, about the divine nature and properties, was shrouded

Journal

American Journal of Theology & PhilosophyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Sep 26, 2010

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