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The American Reception of Jules Lequyer: From James to Hartshorne

The American Reception of Jules Lequyer: From James to Hartshorne donald Wayne Viney / Pittsburg state university he influence of Jules lequyer [or lequier] (1814­1862) in philosophy, especially American philosophy, is disproportionate to the widespread ignorance of his name and to the fragmentary state of his literary remains. on the subject of free will, lequyer's influence on William James (1842­1910) was profound, although James did not acknowledge his debt to the frenchman, nor has it been recognized by most James scholars. it is true that James considered lequyer "a french philosopher of genius,"1 but inexplicably, he never mentioned lequyer by name in his published work. lack of knowledge of lequyer among Anglophones is perhaps not surprising since, in addition to James's curious silence, it took more than a hundred years after lequyer's death for english translations of his work to be made. from the latter half of the nineteenth century until the end of the twentieth century, the non-french reading public could have acquired knowledge of the outline of lequyer's thought, but only by paying very careful attention to philosophical journals, histories of philosophy, and encyclopedias. The American philosopher who, more than any other, introduced lequyer to the english speaking world was charles hartshorne (1897­2000). he provided philosophers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Theology & Philosophy University of Illinois Press

The American Reception of Jules Lequyer: From James to Hartshorne

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University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
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2156-4795
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Abstract

donald Wayne Viney / Pittsburg state university he influence of Jules lequyer [or lequier] (1814­1862) in philosophy, especially American philosophy, is disproportionate to the widespread ignorance of his name and to the fragmentary state of his literary remains. on the subject of free will, lequyer's influence on William James (1842­1910) was profound, although James did not acknowledge his debt to the frenchman, nor has it been recognized by most James scholars. it is true that James considered lequyer "a french philosopher of genius,"1 but inexplicably, he never mentioned lequyer by name in his published work. lack of knowledge of lequyer among Anglophones is perhaps not surprising since, in addition to James's curious silence, it took more than a hundred years after lequyer's death for english translations of his work to be made. from the latter half of the nineteenth century until the end of the twentieth century, the non-french reading public could have acquired knowledge of the outline of lequyer's thought, but only by paying very careful attention to philosophical journals, histories of philosophy, and encyclopedias. The American philosopher who, more than any other, introduced lequyer to the english speaking world was charles hartshorne (1897­2000). he provided philosophers

Journal

American Journal of Theology & PhilosophyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Oct 31, 2015

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