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Responses to Critics

Responses to Critics Daniel A. Dombrowski / Seattle University t is my good fortune to have three critics to respond to who are both insightful readers of two of my books and productive dialectical partners in the (Peircian) asymptotic approach to truth. I. Wagoner and Radical Democracy I would like to initiate my response to Zandra Wagoner by thanking her for her clear and insightful comments and for the opportunity to clarify the relationship between the political liberalism that I defend and Wagoner's own radical democracy. My comments will be divided into two main sections, dealing respectively with: (1) the different emphases in political philosophy that she notices in her own version of radical democracy and my political liberalism; and (2) the complicated issue of religious participation in politics. 1. Different Emphases. (a) Although Wagoner seems at home with a broadly liberal political framework, she is concerned that political liberalism is a bit too tame. Given some uses of the term "liberalism," I understand her concern. But I claim that the sort of political philosophy that emerges not only from Rawls's later writings, but also from the decision-making procedure found in the original position, is a type of radical democracy. Here http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Theology & Philosophy University of Illinois Press

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
2156-4795
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Abstract

Daniel A. Dombrowski / Seattle University t is my good fortune to have three critics to respond to who are both insightful readers of two of my books and productive dialectical partners in the (Peircian) asymptotic approach to truth. I. Wagoner and Radical Democracy I would like to initiate my response to Zandra Wagoner by thanking her for her clear and insightful comments and for the opportunity to clarify the relationship between the political liberalism that I defend and Wagoner's own radical democracy. My comments will be divided into two main sections, dealing respectively with: (1) the different emphases in political philosophy that she notices in her own version of radical democracy and my political liberalism; and (2) the complicated issue of religious participation in politics. 1. Different Emphases. (a) Although Wagoner seems at home with a broadly liberal political framework, she is concerned that political liberalism is a bit too tame. Given some uses of the term "liberalism," I understand her concern. But I claim that the sort of political philosophy that emerges not only from Rawls's later writings, but also from the decision-making procedure found in the original position, is a type of radical democracy. Here

Journal

American Journal of Theology & PhilosophyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Sep 26, 2010

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