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"Let Me Put It This Way: It Works for Me": An Interview with Bob Rafelson

"Let Me Put It This Way: It Works for Me": An Interview with Bob Rafelson monika raesch almost fifty years since he made his first imprint on American popular culture by coproducing The Monkees television show (1966­68), Bob Rafelson is still a hallmark name in the hallways of higher-education film production and theory programs. Those of us who started going to the movies in the late 1960s and early 70s know BBS--the production house of Bert Schneider,1 Bob Rafelson, and Stephen Blauner--as the birthplace of Easy Rider (1969), Five Easy Pieces (1970), and The Last Picture Show (1971). BBS became synonymous with the development of American independent cinema during that time period. Bob Rafelson, one-third of BBS, was born in New York City on February 21, 1933. Rafelson's film career began with the idea of a television show, which would eventually become The Monkees. Although he had this idea years before the concept was turned into the television show, he had to wait for the Beatles to become a worldwide phenomenon for his idea of a television show based on a boy band to be taken seriously by studios. The Monkees won the Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series in 1967 for its first season. This early success opened many doors to Rafelson. He http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

"Let Me Put It This Way: It Works for Me": An Interview with Bob Rafelson

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 65 (3) – Aug 30, 2013

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1934-6018
Publisher site
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Abstract

monika raesch almost fifty years since he made his first imprint on American popular culture by coproducing The Monkees television show (1966­68), Bob Rafelson is still a hallmark name in the hallways of higher-education film production and theory programs. Those of us who started going to the movies in the late 1960s and early 70s know BBS--the production house of Bert Schneider,1 Bob Rafelson, and Stephen Blauner--as the birthplace of Easy Rider (1969), Five Easy Pieces (1970), and The Last Picture Show (1971). BBS became synonymous with the development of American independent cinema during that time period. Bob Rafelson, one-third of BBS, was born in New York City on February 21, 1933. Rafelson's film career began with the idea of a television show, which would eventually become The Monkees. Although he had this idea years before the concept was turned into the television show, he had to wait for the Beatles to become a worldwide phenomenon for his idea of a television show based on a boy band to be taken seriously by studios. The Monkees won the Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series in 1967 for its first season. This early success opened many doors to Rafelson. He

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Aug 30, 2013

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