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Bone Creek (review)

Bone Creek (review) Video Reviews BONE CREEK (2008) Directed by Emily Edwards University Film and Video Association Conference, Colorado College, 2008 Bone Creek tells the story of Nora, an exchange student from Australia who is on a mission to rescue the "magic and folklore of the American rural South before it gets lost." A photography student, she collects images she believes capture the spirit of this area: abandoned tractors, dilapidated houses, and the indigenous ecosystem. These images, however, ultimately prove to be a collection of clichés as conceived by an outsider, and as such they are inherently incapable of capturing the "real" South she seeks. Nora has an outsider's perspective, twice removed; she is a "cultural" outsider who has a narrow, idealistic, and romanticized view of the South, and she is also (ironically) visually impaired from seeing Southern magic and folklore because she seeks it from within the confines of a photographic frame, a construct of a perceived reality filtered by her own aesthetic and preestablished notions (she quotes her photography teacher: "the camera lies because human eyes composed the shot"). Nora's outsider status makes her effectively incapable of realizing that the magic she seeks to preserve in her photographs has http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1934-6018
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Abstract

Video Reviews BONE CREEK (2008) Directed by Emily Edwards University Film and Video Association Conference, Colorado College, 2008 Bone Creek tells the story of Nora, an exchange student from Australia who is on a mission to rescue the "magic and folklore of the American rural South before it gets lost." A photography student, she collects images she believes capture the spirit of this area: abandoned tractors, dilapidated houses, and the indigenous ecosystem. These images, however, ultimately prove to be a collection of clichés as conceived by an outsider, and as such they are inherently incapable of capturing the "real" South she seeks. Nora has an outsider's perspective, twice removed; she is a "cultural" outsider who has a narrow, idealistic, and romanticized view of the South, and she is also (ironically) visually impaired from seeing Southern magic and folklore because she seeks it from within the confines of a photographic frame, a construct of a perceived reality filtered by her own aesthetic and preestablished notions (she quotes her photography teacher: "the camera lies because human eyes composed the shot"). Nora's outsider status makes her effectively incapable of realizing that the magic she seeks to preserve in her photographs has

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Sep 23, 2009

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