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Baudelaire’s Critique of Sculpture

Baudelaire’s Critique of Sculpture Abstract: Baudelaire’s provocatively titled article “Pourquoi la sculpture est ennuyeuse” (“Why Sculpture Is Boring,” 1846) has serious implications for sculpture. I state his objections in argument form; I present a response based on comments by fellow sculptor David Smith and explain why it is unsatisfactory; I propose and justify a paradigm shift, formulated with reasonable precision, that achieves a satisfactory resolution; and I note advantages of the new paradigm that are independent of the need to respond to Baudelaire. The paper has several audiences in mind. The new paradigm is illustrated with my own work, so other artists can see its benefits in concrete terms they can apply to their own work. Philosophers will see familiar theories and methods leading to progress in art. Art critics will come away with improved tools for understanding, evaluating, and explaining the aesthetics of the third dimension, tools also useful to art teachers. The general public will find the basics of a tutorial for enhancing the appreciation of sculpture. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Aesthetic Education University of Illinois Press

Baudelaire’s Critique of Sculpture

The Journal of Aesthetic Education , Volume 49 (3) – Aug 20, 2015

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1543-7809
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: Baudelaire’s provocatively titled article “Pourquoi la sculpture est ennuyeuse” (“Why Sculpture Is Boring,” 1846) has serious implications for sculpture. I state his objections in argument form; I present a response based on comments by fellow sculptor David Smith and explain why it is unsatisfactory; I propose and justify a paradigm shift, formulated with reasonable precision, that achieves a satisfactory resolution; and I note advantages of the new paradigm that are independent of the need to respond to Baudelaire. The paper has several audiences in mind. The new paradigm is illustrated with my own work, so other artists can see its benefits in concrete terms they can apply to their own work. Philosophers will see familiar theories and methods leading to progress in art. Art critics will come away with improved tools for understanding, evaluating, and explaining the aesthetics of the third dimension, tools also useful to art teachers. The general public will find the basics of a tutorial for enhancing the appreciation of sculpture.

Journal

The Journal of Aesthetic EducationUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Aug 20, 2015

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