Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

World History: Ideologies, Structures, and Identities (review)

World History: Ideologies, Structures, and Identities (review) journal of world history, fall 2000 World History: Ideologies, Structures and Identities. Edited by philip pomper, richard h. elphick, and richard t. vann. Malden, Mass. and Oxford, U.K.: Blackwell, 1998. Pp. ix + 286. $66.95 (cloth); $33.95 (paper). We have here a very valuable collection that must help anyone to clarify what world history is. This is by no means a hegemonic book, where we end up being told how to "do" world history. To the contrary, the collection is particularly useful because it represents so many points of view, and thus will stimulate discussion and no doubt rebuttal from practitioners of very divergent versions of world history. I will now proceed to comment seriatim on the offerings. The volume fittingly begins with a chapter from William H. Book Reviews McNeill, who is generally considered to be the doyen of the field. In a typically graceful and lucid discussion, he sketches various historiographical traditions, and sees the way forward as being the study of "trans-civilizational encounters" (p. 27) based on the notion of ecumenical history. He ends on a positive note, claiming that the field has a social purpose, for "constructing a perspicacious and accurate world history, historians http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

World History: Ideologies, Structures, and Identities (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/world-history-ideologies-structures-and-identities-review-hfCTWMpvYM
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

journal of world history, fall 2000 World History: Ideologies, Structures and Identities. Edited by philip pomper, richard h. elphick, and richard t. vann. Malden, Mass. and Oxford, U.K.: Blackwell, 1998. Pp. ix + 286. $66.95 (cloth); $33.95 (paper). We have here a very valuable collection that must help anyone to clarify what world history is. This is by no means a hegemonic book, where we end up being told how to "do" world history. To the contrary, the collection is particularly useful because it represents so many points of view, and thus will stimulate discussion and no doubt rebuttal from practitioners of very divergent versions of world history. I will now proceed to comment seriatim on the offerings. The volume fittingly begins with a chapter from William H. Book Reviews McNeill, who is generally considered to be the doyen of the field. In a typically graceful and lucid discussion, he sketches various historiographical traditions, and sees the way forward as being the study of "trans-civilizational encounters" (p. 27) based on the notion of ecumenical history. He ends on a positive note, claiming that the field has a social purpose, for "constructing a perspicacious and accurate world history, historians

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.