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Women’s Poetry of Late Imperial China: Transforming the Inner Chambers by Xiaorong Li (review)

Women’s Poetry of Late Imperial China: Transforming the Inner Chambers by Xiaorong Li (review) Reviews 109 that although Yan is concerned with the social and political transformations that have allowed for the liberation of the Chinese individual, he does not always consider the ways in which individual liberation has also entailed a consistent degree of socialization, social control, and conformity. Chinese Modernity and the Individual Psyche thus acts as both a counterpart and a supplement to Yan's previous work, and adds timely and useful insights into how Chinese modernity deviates from the assumption that urbanization and industrialization necessarily go hand-in-hand with individual liberation. In spite of the diversity of these essays, they all fit together nicely and highlight new ethnographic and theoretical approaches to problems of modernity and individualism in contemporary Chinese society. Typos and grammatical issues are at times distracting, and certain essays veer uncomfortably close to revealing the author's dissatisfaction with current social trends. However, most essays maintain a balanced tone and are convincingly argued. Chinese Modernity and the Individual Psyche should be considered useful reading for anyone interested in the conflicts, tensions, and social demands at work in today's China. Emily Baum Emily Baum is an assistant professor of modern Chinese history at UC Irvine. She researches the history http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Women’s Poetry of Late Imperial China: Transforming the Inner Chambers by Xiaorong Li (review)

China Review International , Volume 20 (1) – Jan 22, 2013

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9367
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Abstract

Reviews 109 that although Yan is concerned with the social and political transformations that have allowed for the liberation of the Chinese individual, he does not always consider the ways in which individual liberation has also entailed a consistent degree of socialization, social control, and conformity. Chinese Modernity and the Individual Psyche thus acts as both a counterpart and a supplement to Yan's previous work, and adds timely and useful insights into how Chinese modernity deviates from the assumption that urbanization and industrialization necessarily go hand-in-hand with individual liberation. In spite of the diversity of these essays, they all fit together nicely and highlight new ethnographic and theoretical approaches to problems of modernity and individualism in contemporary Chinese society. Typos and grammatical issues are at times distracting, and certain essays veer uncomfortably close to revealing the author's dissatisfaction with current social trends. However, most essays maintain a balanced tone and are convincingly argued. Chinese Modernity and the Individual Psyche should be considered useful reading for anyone interested in the conflicts, tensions, and social demands at work in today's China. Emily Baum Emily Baum is an assistant professor of modern Chinese history at UC Irvine. She researches the history

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 22, 2013

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