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Women in Early Imperial China (review)

Women in Early Imperial China (review) 112 China Review International: Vol. 11, No. 1, Spring 2004 China Coast, 960­1960," in David Johnson, Andrew J. Nathan, and Evelyn S. Rawski, eds., Popular Culture in Late Imperial China (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985), pp. 292­ 324, and "Rites or Beliefs? The Construction of a Unified Culture in Late Imperial China," in Lowell Dittmer and Samuel S. Kim, eds., China's Quest for National Identity (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1993), pp. 80­103. 9. I have conducted searches for relevant key words in Academia Sinica computer databases, including the Hanji quanwen ziliaoku !"#$ (http://www.sinica.edu.tw/ !"#$%&' (www. !"#$% (http://140.109.8.44/ ~tdbproj/handy1/), the Wenyuan ge siku quanshu dianzi ban sikuquanshu.com), and the Shuwei gujin tushu jicheng gjts/index.htm). 10. Szonyi, Practicing Kinship, pp. 177­178, 280; Kenneth Dean, "Transformation of the She (Altars of the Soil) in Fujian," Cahiers d'Extrême Asie 10 (1998): 38. See also Wang Mingming, "Place, Administration, and Territorial Cults in Late Imperial China: A Case Study from South Fujian," Late Imperial China 16, no. 1 (June 1995): 48­53. Bret Hinsch. Women in Early Imperial China. Lanham, Boulder, New York, and Oxford: Rowman and Littlefield, 2002. xi, 237 pp. Paperback $26.95, isbn 0­7425­1872­8. At a time when Western interest in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Women in Early Imperial China (review)

China Review International , Volume 11 (1) – Jan 18, 2004

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9367
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Abstract

112 China Review International: Vol. 11, No. 1, Spring 2004 China Coast, 960­1960," in David Johnson, Andrew J. Nathan, and Evelyn S. Rawski, eds., Popular Culture in Late Imperial China (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985), pp. 292­ 324, and "Rites or Beliefs? The Construction of a Unified Culture in Late Imperial China," in Lowell Dittmer and Samuel S. Kim, eds., China's Quest for National Identity (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1993), pp. 80­103. 9. I have conducted searches for relevant key words in Academia Sinica computer databases, including the Hanji quanwen ziliaoku !"#$ (http://www.sinica.edu.tw/ !"#$%&' (www. !"#$% (http://140.109.8.44/ ~tdbproj/handy1/), the Wenyuan ge siku quanshu dianzi ban sikuquanshu.com), and the Shuwei gujin tushu jicheng gjts/index.htm). 10. Szonyi, Practicing Kinship, pp. 177­178, 280; Kenneth Dean, "Transformation of the She (Altars of the Soil) in Fujian," Cahiers d'Extrême Asie 10 (1998): 38. See also Wang Mingming, "Place, Administration, and Territorial Cults in Late Imperial China: A Case Study from South Fujian," Late Imperial China 16, no. 1 (June 1995): 48­53. Bret Hinsch. Women in Early Imperial China. Lanham, Boulder, New York, and Oxford: Rowman and Littlefield, 2002. xi, 237 pp. Paperback $26.95, isbn 0­7425­1872­8. At a time when Western interest in

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 18, 2004

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