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Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?: Understanding Historical Change (review)

Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?: Understanding Historical Change (review) Book Reviews Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse? Understanding Historical Change. By robert strayer. New York: M. E. Sharpe, 1998. Pp. xi + 232. $55.95 (cloth); $23.95 (paper). In the years since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in December 1991, scholars and popular writers have produced a veritable avalanche of books on this monumental event in world history. Many of these studies, including Moshe Lewin's Russia-USSR-Russia: The Drive and Drift of a Superstate (1995), Jerry Hough's Democratization and Revolution in the USSR, 1985­1991 (1997), and Archie Brown's The Gorbachev Factor (1996), trace the processes by which a nation of enormous size and military might imploded virtually overnight and with surprisingly little bloodshed. A welcome addition to this evergrowing genre is Robert Strayer's Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse? Understanding Historical Change, which successfully undertakes a postmortem of the USSR in a succinct and highly engaging two-hundredpage text. Employing a readable style, Strayer (professor of history at SUNY-Brockport) presents the Soviet Union as a unique political and social entity in world history. In comparison to the multinational empires that preceded it, particularly the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman, the Soviet Union exhibited historical uniqueness in the nature and speed of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?: Understanding Historical Change (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (2) – Oct 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse? Understanding Historical Change. By robert strayer. New York: M. E. Sharpe, 1998. Pp. xi + 232. $55.95 (cloth); $23.95 (paper). In the years since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in December 1991, scholars and popular writers have produced a veritable avalanche of books on this monumental event in world history. Many of these studies, including Moshe Lewin's Russia-USSR-Russia: The Drive and Drift of a Superstate (1995), Jerry Hough's Democratization and Revolution in the USSR, 1985­1991 (1997), and Archie Brown's The Gorbachev Factor (1996), trace the processes by which a nation of enormous size and military might imploded virtually overnight and with surprisingly little bloodshed. A welcome addition to this evergrowing genre is Robert Strayer's Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse? Understanding Historical Change, which successfully undertakes a postmortem of the USSR in a succinct and highly engaging two-hundredpage text. Employing a readable style, Strayer (professor of history at SUNY-Brockport) presents the Soviet Union as a unique political and social entity in world history. In comparison to the multinational empires that preceded it, particularly the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman, the Soviet Union exhibited historical uniqueness in the nature and speed of

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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