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What's a Peasant to Do? Village Becoming Town in South China (review)

What's a Peasant to Do? Village Becoming Town in South China (review) 102 China Review International: Vol. 11, No. 1, Spring 2004 the changing law and the limits of reform, concludes with the statement "A universalistic and civil enlightenment may be the prerequisite for true citizenship to take hold on Chinese soil" (p. 307). Various contributors note that citizenship has been a crucial element in statebuilding strategies for totalitarian regimes as much as for liberal democracies. The editors are careful to note in the introduction that citizenship is not just another term for democratization or civil society. Yet that is what it sometimes becomes. When understood as liberal citizenship or civic republicanism, the search for the meaning of citizenship in China, like earlier studies of civil society, sometimes develops into a search for something that is defined largely by the ways in which it is misunderstood or even absent. What is most interesting, however, in this rich and informative collection, are the political values and practices that are found and the context for and nature of the changes and continuities in relationship between the members of society and the state in modern China that they reveal. This volume should prove useful not just to scholars of China but also to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

What's a Peasant to Do? Village Becoming Town in South China (review)

China Review International , Volume 11 (1) – Jan 18, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

102 China Review International: Vol. 11, No. 1, Spring 2004 the changing law and the limits of reform, concludes with the statement "A universalistic and civil enlightenment may be the prerequisite for true citizenship to take hold on Chinese soil" (p. 307). Various contributors note that citizenship has been a crucial element in statebuilding strategies for totalitarian regimes as much as for liberal democracies. The editors are careful to note in the introduction that citizenship is not just another term for democratization or civil society. Yet that is what it sometimes becomes. When understood as liberal citizenship or civic republicanism, the search for the meaning of citizenship in China, like earlier studies of civil society, sometimes develops into a search for something that is defined largely by the ways in which it is misunderstood or even absent. What is most interesting, however, in this rich and informative collection, are the political values and practices that are found and the context for and nature of the changes and continuities in relationship between the members of society and the state in modern China that they reveal. This volume should prove useful not just to scholars of China but also to

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 18, 2004

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