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Transatlantic Radicals and the Early American Republic (review)

Transatlantic Radicals and the Early American Republic (review) journal of world history, fall 2000 Transatlantic Radicals and the Early American Republic. By michael durey. Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1997. Pp. xi + 425. $45.00 (cloth). Since the publication of Caroline Robbins's The Eighteenth Century Commonwealthman in 1959, a series of groundbreaking studies by Bernard Bailyn, John Pocock, Gordon Wood, and others have radically transformed our understanding of American political culture during the eighteenth century. Turning away from an emphasis on the indigenous sources of American politics, these historians instead located the origins of American political culture within an English republican tradition that, in turn, owed much to the civic humanism of the Italian Renaissance. The direction of this work--with its emphasis on the transmission of political ideas of the Old World to the New--signaled a reorientation in the study of American politics and a break with the older Turnerian assumptions of progressive historians like Charles Beard. At least until recently, the idea of a "republican paradigm" had itself become paradigmatic for historians of colonial America and the early republic. Ironically, however, the success these historians enjoyed has inhabited others from exploring any further the process of ideological transmission which was so central to their work. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Transatlantic Radicals and the Early American Republic (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (2) – Oct 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

journal of world history, fall 2000 Transatlantic Radicals and the Early American Republic. By michael durey. Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1997. Pp. xi + 425. $45.00 (cloth). Since the publication of Caroline Robbins's The Eighteenth Century Commonwealthman in 1959, a series of groundbreaking studies by Bernard Bailyn, John Pocock, Gordon Wood, and others have radically transformed our understanding of American political culture during the eighteenth century. Turning away from an emphasis on the indigenous sources of American politics, these historians instead located the origins of American political culture within an English republican tradition that, in turn, owed much to the civic humanism of the Italian Renaissance. The direction of this work--with its emphasis on the transmission of political ideas of the Old World to the New--signaled a reorientation in the study of American politics and a break with the older Turnerian assumptions of progressive historians like Charles Beard. At least until recently, the idea of a "republican paradigm" had itself become paradigmatic for historians of colonial America and the early republic. Ironically, however, the success these historians enjoyed has inhabited others from exploring any further the process of ideological transmission which was so central to their work.

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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