Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Time and Place in San Francisco: Some Thoughts for the Urban Wanderer

Time and Place in San Francisco: Some Thoughts for the Urban Wanderer Larry Ford San Diego State University If a city has to be destroyed in some disaster like an earthquake and a fire, it helps if it happens toward the end of a really good architectural era so that beautiful and picturesque buildings can be (re)built with the very latest in infrastructure improvements. This is exactly what happened in San Francisco, and it is one of the reasons the city is known for its grace and charm. Much of San Francisco was destroyed in 1906 and was rebuilt quickly over the next few years. This meant that the city retained a late Victorian charm with highly detailed and intricate façades but also with 20th-century (albeit early) plumbing, heating, and electricity. The landscape of San Francisco, at least in the northeastern quadrant, is thus both old-fashioned and reasonably modern. It shares many characteristics with European cities such as London and Paris, which were rebuilt in larger but still-traditional styles during the 19th and early 20th centuries in situ since public transit Figure 1. The Great San Francisco Earthquake in 1906. © 2009 by the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers. All rights reserved. and an historical connection to the center remained http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers University of Hawai'I Press

Time and Place in San Francisco: Some Thoughts for the Urban Wanderer

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/time-and-place-in-san-francisco-some-thoughts-for-the-urban-wanderer-4UNv4OS8MI
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1551-3211
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Larry Ford San Diego State University If a city has to be destroyed in some disaster like an earthquake and a fire, it helps if it happens toward the end of a really good architectural era so that beautiful and picturesque buildings can be (re)built with the very latest in infrastructure improvements. This is exactly what happened in San Francisco, and it is one of the reasons the city is known for its grace and charm. Much of San Francisco was destroyed in 1906 and was rebuilt quickly over the next few years. This meant that the city retained a late Victorian charm with highly detailed and intricate façades but also with 20th-century (albeit early) plumbing, heating, and electricity. The landscape of San Francisco, at least in the northeastern quadrant, is thus both old-fashioned and reasonably modern. It shares many characteristics with European cities such as London and Paris, which were rebuilt in larger but still-traditional styles during the 19th and early 20th centuries in situ since public transit Figure 1. The Great San Francisco Earthquake in 1906. © 2009 by the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers. All rights reserved. and an historical connection to the center remained

Journal

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast GeographersUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 10, 2009

There are no references for this article.