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The Russian Empire and the World, 1700-1917: The Geopolitics of Expansion and Containment (review)

The Russian Empire and the World, 1700-1917: The Geopolitics of Expansion and Containment (review) journal of world history, fall 2000 The Russian Empire and the World, 1700­1917: The Geopolitics of Expansion and Containment. By john p. ledonne. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. Pp. xix + 394. $26.95 (cloth). In the late seventeenth century, the Russian state was a second-tier player in international politics, whose territory was confined (for the most part) to the taiga and tundra zones of northeastern Eurasia, but by the early twentieth century, it had become one of the world's great powers and its territory had expanded enormously in almost every direction: west into the Baltic region and Poland, south to the Black Sea, the Caucasus, and Central Asia, and east to the edges of Manchuria and the Sea of Japan. The obvious question is: How did this happen? How was the Russian state able to expand with such phenomenal success through much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and why, in fact, did it ever stop expanding? John LeDonne's erudite survey of Russian foreign relations between 1700 and 1917 offers a largely familiar yet powerfully argued answer to this question: It was a combination of geography and power politics. Geography determined where Russia would try to expand http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Russian Empire and the World, 1700-1917: The Geopolitics of Expansion and Containment (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (2) – Oct 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
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Abstract

journal of world history, fall 2000 The Russian Empire and the World, 1700­1917: The Geopolitics of Expansion and Containment. By john p. ledonne. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. Pp. xix + 394. $26.95 (cloth). In the late seventeenth century, the Russian state was a second-tier player in international politics, whose territory was confined (for the most part) to the taiga and tundra zones of northeastern Eurasia, but by the early twentieth century, it had become one of the world's great powers and its territory had expanded enormously in almost every direction: west into the Baltic region and Poland, south to the Black Sea, the Caucasus, and Central Asia, and east to the edges of Manchuria and the Sea of Japan. The obvious question is: How did this happen? How was the Russian state able to expand with such phenomenal success through much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and why, in fact, did it ever stop expanding? John LeDonne's erudite survey of Russian foreign relations between 1700 and 1917 offers a largely familiar yet powerfully argued answer to this question: It was a combination of geography and power politics. Geography determined where Russia would try to expand

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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