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The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches (review)

The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches (review) 54 China Review International: Vol. 11, No. 1, Spring 2004 Kim-chong Chong, Sor-hoon Tan, and C. L. Ten, editors. The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches. Chicago and La Salle: Open Court, 2003. xxiv, 307 pp. Paperback $29.95, isbn 0­8126­9535­6. Comparative philosophy as an institutionalized and academic field is still a young discipline. It could, of course, be argued that it has been practiced since the first philosophers appeared on the scene, for any philosophical activity is, after all, comparative in character. However, the discipline of comparative philosophy does not understand itself in such a broad manner as to include just any philosophical discussion, but explicitly takes traditions, cultures, or other predefined communities as terms of reference. It is therefore a fundamental challenge for comparative philosophers to do appropriate justice to the diversity, porosity, and dynamism of any such entity. Since these properties suggest inner tensions instead of a harmonized unity, and openness instead of hermetic borders, it is always an artificial, and, to some extent, an arbitrary act to draw borders between different traditions, cultures, or, for example, language communities. Thus, it is up to comparative philosophy to demonstrate that its focus is indeed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches (review)

China Review International , Volume 11 (1) – Jan 18, 2004

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9367
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Abstract

54 China Review International: Vol. 11, No. 1, Spring 2004 Kim-chong Chong, Sor-hoon Tan, and C. L. Ten, editors. The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches. Chicago and La Salle: Open Court, 2003. xxiv, 307 pp. Paperback $29.95, isbn 0­8126­9535­6. Comparative philosophy as an institutionalized and academic field is still a young discipline. It could, of course, be argued that it has been practiced since the first philosophers appeared on the scene, for any philosophical activity is, after all, comparative in character. However, the discipline of comparative philosophy does not understand itself in such a broad manner as to include just any philosophical discussion, but explicitly takes traditions, cultures, or other predefined communities as terms of reference. It is therefore a fundamental challenge for comparative philosophers to do appropriate justice to the diversity, porosity, and dynamism of any such entity. Since these properties suggest inner tensions instead of a harmonized unity, and openness instead of hermetic borders, it is always an artificial, and, to some extent, an arbitrary act to draw borders between different traditions, cultures, or, for example, language communities. Thus, it is up to comparative philosophy to demonstrate that its focus is indeed

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 18, 2004

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