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The Last Thousand Days of the British Empire: Churchill, Roosevelt, and the Birth of the Pax Americana (review)

The Last Thousand Days of the British Empire: Churchill, Roosevelt, and the Birth of the Pax... journal of world history, december 2009 scholarly debate with which Behrman engages only briefly and peripherally (p. 36). The Most Noble Adventure illustrates the strengths and limitations of a narrative, single country­based study focused on high-level policymakers. It is an engaging read in the best traditions of diplomatic history. It is one of the few works on the Marshall Plan to cover the entire plan from start to finish, devoting half of its pages to the origins of the plan and half to its implementation and unwinding. Its emphasis on individual agency over structural forces is a helpful corrective to more impersonal, economically focused works. Behrman's point that much of the Marshall Plan's success derived from its top-tier managerial talent, including plan administrator and Studebaker president Paul Hoffman, is well taken. For all these reasons, The Most Noble Adventure is a welcome contribution to the ongoing debates over the Marshall Plan. george fujii University of California, Santa Barbara The Last Thousand Days of the British Empire: Churchill, Roosevelt, and the Birth of the Pax Americana. By peter clarke. New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2008. 592 pp. $35.00 (cloth). "I have not become the King's First Minister in order to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Last Thousand Days of the British Empire: Churchill, Roosevelt, and the Birth of the Pax Americana (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 20 (4) – Dec 23, 2009

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-8050
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Abstract

journal of world history, december 2009 scholarly debate with which Behrman engages only briefly and peripherally (p. 36). The Most Noble Adventure illustrates the strengths and limitations of a narrative, single country­based study focused on high-level policymakers. It is an engaging read in the best traditions of diplomatic history. It is one of the few works on the Marshall Plan to cover the entire plan from start to finish, devoting half of its pages to the origins of the plan and half to its implementation and unwinding. Its emphasis on individual agency over structural forces is a helpful corrective to more impersonal, economically focused works. Behrman's point that much of the Marshall Plan's success derived from its top-tier managerial talent, including plan administrator and Studebaker president Paul Hoffman, is well taken. For all these reasons, The Most Noble Adventure is a welcome contribution to the ongoing debates over the Marshall Plan. george fujii University of California, Santa Barbara The Last Thousand Days of the British Empire: Churchill, Roosevelt, and the Birth of the Pax Americana. By peter clarke. New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2008. 592 pp. $35.00 (cloth). "I have not become the King's First Minister in order to

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 23, 2009

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