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The Future of Indigenous Museums: Perspectives from the Southwest Pacific (review)

The Future of Indigenous Museums: Perspectives from the Southwest Pacific (review) book and media reviews ing" (5). For a book that relies heavily on Marxist theory, this is a decidedly non-dialectical statement. One might argue that this gap is always being provisionally and strategically crossed, overcome, or displaced through social movements by Native Pacific peoples fighting wars, both discursive and real, on both Asian and American fronts. Transpacific Imaginations is an inspired and wide-ranging book that, like many works of literary history, would benefit from a bit more attention to the social. authors follow Soroi Marepo Eoe and Pamela Swadling's Museums and Cultural Centres in the Pacific (1991) in developing the theme of indigenous museums while also confronting the term "indigenous museum." Editor Nick Stanley organizes the essays geographically, putting the institutions or programs on equal footing in this volume that redefines assumptions about museums in the Pacific. The Future of Indigenous Museums presents prominent museums alongside the unexpected alternatives to museums, such as the long-standing Papua New Guinea (PNG) National Museum flanking Eric Venbrux's description of the Bathurst and Melville Islands as open-air museums where Aborigines, like the Kanak community of Lifou (explored by Tate LeFevre in chapter 5), orchestrate "exhibitions" of culture for tourists. The sections on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Future of Indigenous Museums: Perspectives from the Southwest Pacific (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 22 (1) – Feb 21, 2010

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9464
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Abstract

book and media reviews ing" (5). For a book that relies heavily on Marxist theory, this is a decidedly non-dialectical statement. One might argue that this gap is always being provisionally and strategically crossed, overcome, or displaced through social movements by Native Pacific peoples fighting wars, both discursive and real, on both Asian and American fronts. Transpacific Imaginations is an inspired and wide-ranging book that, like many works of literary history, would benefit from a bit more attention to the social. authors follow Soroi Marepo Eoe and Pamela Swadling's Museums and Cultural Centres in the Pacific (1991) in developing the theme of indigenous museums while also confronting the term "indigenous museum." Editor Nick Stanley organizes the essays geographically, putting the institutions or programs on equal footing in this volume that redefines assumptions about museums in the Pacific. The Future of Indigenous Museums presents prominent museums alongside the unexpected alternatives to museums, such as the long-standing Papua New Guinea (PNG) National Museum flanking Eric Venbrux's description of the Bathurst and Melville Islands as open-air museums where Aborigines, like the Kanak community of Lifou (explored by Tate LeFevre in chapter 5), orchestrate "exhibitions" of culture for tourists. The sections on

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 21, 2010

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