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The Barbarian Conversion: From Paganism to Christianity (review)

The Barbarian Conversion: From Paganism to Christianity (review) Book Reviews The Barbarian Conversion: From Paganism to Christianity. By richard fletcher. New York: Holt, 1998. Pp. xiii + 562. $35.00 (cloth). The author's objective was to write a book for the general public rather than for his specialized colleagues in medieval studies. In keeping with this goal, the author's thesis is very clearly stated in the first sentence of his Preface--"This book is an investigation of the process by which large parts of Europe accepted the Christian faith between the fourth and the fourteenth centuries and some of the cultural consequences that flowed therefrom." In short, this volume is a descriptive survey of a very broad and complex topic. Since the last attempt at such an undertaking was by the Reverend C. H. Robinson (The Conversion of Europe) in 1917, it is time for a new study and the synthesis of this topic. Richard Fletcher wisely points out that religious conversion is not only limited to an abstract change in dogma and doctrine, but it also entails significant cultural consequences that flow from such major shifts in belief. In the case of most of Western, Northern, and Central Europe, this meant a rejection of Celtic, German, Slavic, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Barbarian Conversion: From Paganism to Christianity (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (2) – Oct 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews The Barbarian Conversion: From Paganism to Christianity. By richard fletcher. New York: Holt, 1998. Pp. xiii + 562. $35.00 (cloth). The author's objective was to write a book for the general public rather than for his specialized colleagues in medieval studies. In keeping with this goal, the author's thesis is very clearly stated in the first sentence of his Preface--"This book is an investigation of the process by which large parts of Europe accepted the Christian faith between the fourth and the fourteenth centuries and some of the cultural consequences that flowed therefrom." In short, this volume is a descriptive survey of a very broad and complex topic. Since the last attempt at such an undertaking was by the Reverend C. H. Robinson (The Conversion of Europe) in 1917, it is time for a new study and the synthesis of this topic. Richard Fletcher wisely points out that religious conversion is not only limited to an abstract change in dogma and doctrine, but it also entails significant cultural consequences that flow from such major shifts in belief. In the case of most of Western, Northern, and Central Europe, this meant a rejection of Celtic, German, Slavic,

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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