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Russia's Orient: Imperial Borderlands and Peoples, 1700-1917 (review)

Russia's Orient: Imperial Borderlands and Peoples, 1700-1917 (review) Book Reviews Russia's Orient: Imperial Borderlands and Peoples, 1700­1917. Edited by daniel r. brower and edward j. lazzerini. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1997. Pp. xx + 339. $39.95 (cloth); $19.95 (paper). Now that both the Romanovs and the Soviets have failed in their attempts to tie "forever" Russia's "oriental borderlands" to "Great Russia," the time is propitious to analyze the past three centuries of Russian approaches, perceptions, and policies towards its numerous inorodtsy (non-Christian subjects). The policies of Tsarist Russia evolved from unsuccessful efforts at proselytizing to a tolerance of native traditions (religious ones included), but Russian suspicion of native institutions remained. The conquered peoples were initially treated as vassals, then as colonial subjects, and finally selectively as potential citizens, but the attainment of the last stage was much more accessible to Christians, such as Georgians or Armenians, than to Muslims, for example. Administratively, St. Petersburg subjected Russia's Orient to a variety of forms of governance, ranging from protectorates (Khiva, Bukhara), administration by namestniks who exercised powers similar to British India's viceroys (Caucasus), governors-general with namestnik powers (Turkestan, Steppe Region), or else a standard administration headed by regular governors (as in Crimea). Whatever the approach, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Russia's Orient: Imperial Borderlands and Peoples, 1700-1917 (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (2) – Oct 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-8050
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Abstract

Book Reviews Russia's Orient: Imperial Borderlands and Peoples, 1700­1917. Edited by daniel r. brower and edward j. lazzerini. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1997. Pp. xx + 339. $39.95 (cloth); $19.95 (paper). Now that both the Romanovs and the Soviets have failed in their attempts to tie "forever" Russia's "oriental borderlands" to "Great Russia," the time is propitious to analyze the past three centuries of Russian approaches, perceptions, and policies towards its numerous inorodtsy (non-Christian subjects). The policies of Tsarist Russia evolved from unsuccessful efforts at proselytizing to a tolerance of native traditions (religious ones included), but Russian suspicion of native institutions remained. The conquered peoples were initially treated as vassals, then as colonial subjects, and finally selectively as potential citizens, but the attainment of the last stage was much more accessible to Christians, such as Georgians or Armenians, than to Muslims, for example. Administratively, St. Petersburg subjected Russia's Orient to a variety of forms of governance, ranging from protectorates (Khiva, Bukhara), administration by namestniks who exercised powers similar to British India's viceroys (Caucasus), governors-general with namestnik powers (Turkestan, Steppe Region), or else a standard administration headed by regular governors (as in Crimea). Whatever the approach, the

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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