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Rural China in Transformation

Rural China in Transformation Reviews 151 Rachel Murphy. How Migrant Labor is Changing Rural China. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2002. xx, 286 pp. Hardcover $70.00, isbn 0­521­80901­0. Paperback $25.00, isbn 0­521­00530­2. Hiroshi Sato. The Growth of Market Relations in Post-reform Rural China: A Micro-analysis of Peasants, Migrants and Peasant Entrepreneurs. London and New York: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003. xv, 240 pp. Hardcover $100.00, isbn 0­7007­1726­9. Since 1978, when China launched its first set of reforms in the countryside, its rural areas have undergone several distinctive phases of change that have transformed their social, economic, and political landscape. Chinese villagers, under conditions not entirely of their own making, have divided land, built rural industries, migrated en masse to the cities, and returned to stake out a private realm of entrepreneurship in a dogged attempt to improve their livelihood against great odds. The result is a general rise in the material standard of living in the rural areas, but prosperity has been marred by a growing gap in income and wealth among villagers, and between villagers and urban dwellers. New social actors have begun to emerge in the countryside. Entrepreneurs, petty-commodity producers, migrants, rural-industry workers, and subcontracting farmers now dot the rural landscape and point http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Rural China in Transformation

China Review International , Volume 11 (1) – Jan 18, 2004

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

Reviews 151 Rachel Murphy. How Migrant Labor is Changing Rural China. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2002. xx, 286 pp. Hardcover $70.00, isbn 0­521­80901­0. Paperback $25.00, isbn 0­521­00530­2. Hiroshi Sato. The Growth of Market Relations in Post-reform Rural China: A Micro-analysis of Peasants, Migrants and Peasant Entrepreneurs. London and New York: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003. xv, 240 pp. Hardcover $100.00, isbn 0­7007­1726­9. Since 1978, when China launched its first set of reforms in the countryside, its rural areas have undergone several distinctive phases of change that have transformed their social, economic, and political landscape. Chinese villagers, under conditions not entirely of their own making, have divided land, built rural industries, migrated en masse to the cities, and returned to stake out a private realm of entrepreneurship in a dogged attempt to improve their livelihood against great odds. The result is a general rise in the material standard of living in the rural areas, but prosperity has been marred by a growing gap in income and wealth among villagers, and between villagers and urban dwellers. New social actors have begun to emerge in the countryside. Entrepreneurs, petty-commodity producers, migrants, rural-industry workers, and subcontracting farmers now dot the rural landscape and point

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 18, 2004

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