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Ritual and Mythology of the Chinese Triads: Creating an Identity (review)

Ritual and Mythology of the Chinese Triads: Creating an Identity (review) 180 China Review International: Vol. 11, No. 1, Spring 2004 5. Zhu Xi repeatedly warns us not to neglect words that might appear insignificant in a text. See, for instance, Zhuzi yulei, juan 11. 6. The most common graph for "patient" or "tolerant" in classical Chinese is ren appears in Analects 15.27, where Slingerland correctly translates its negation bu-ren "impatient." , and it as Barend J. ter Haar. Ritual and Mythology of the Chinese Triads: Creating an Identity. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1998. xiii, 517 pp. Hardcover $215.00, isbn 90­ 04­11063­1. Papercover (2000) $42.50, isbn 90­04­11944­2. This massive, exhaustive, one-of-a-kind scholarly masterpiece is truly a tour de force, a work so impressive in its scope and attention to fine detail as to be indispensable to libraries and scholars in the field of sinology. It does, however, require some effort and a great amount of dedication and time to read through the entire 517 pages of this thorough and intensive presentation. The book is divided into four parts, which in fact represent four very different pursuits: (1) Triad sources, Western and Chinese; (2) the performance of Triad and other Hui (similar trade group) rituals; (3) the narratives and lore http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Ritual and Mythology of the Chinese Triads: Creating an Identity (review)

China Review International , Volume 11 (1) – Jan 18, 2004

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9367
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Abstract

180 China Review International: Vol. 11, No. 1, Spring 2004 5. Zhu Xi repeatedly warns us not to neglect words that might appear insignificant in a text. See, for instance, Zhuzi yulei, juan 11. 6. The most common graph for "patient" or "tolerant" in classical Chinese is ren appears in Analects 15.27, where Slingerland correctly translates its negation bu-ren "impatient." , and it as Barend J. ter Haar. Ritual and Mythology of the Chinese Triads: Creating an Identity. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1998. xiii, 517 pp. Hardcover $215.00, isbn 90­ 04­11063­1. Papercover (2000) $42.50, isbn 90­04­11944­2. This massive, exhaustive, one-of-a-kind scholarly masterpiece is truly a tour de force, a work so impressive in its scope and attention to fine detail as to be indispensable to libraries and scholars in the field of sinology. It does, however, require some effort and a great amount of dedication and time to read through the entire 517 pages of this thorough and intensive presentation. The book is divided into four parts, which in fact represent four very different pursuits: (1) Triad sources, Western and Chinese; (2) the performance of Triad and other Hui (similar trade group) rituals; (3) the narratives and lore

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 18, 2004

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