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Protestantism and Politics in Korea (review)

Protestantism and Politics in Korea (review) NOTE 1. The section on Yongbi 0ch'0n-ga is largely a condensed, word-for-word reprinting of Lee's earlier work contained in Celebration of Continuity: Themes in Classic East Asian Poetry (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1979), 11­33. Protestantism and Politics in Korea, by Chung-Shin Park. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2003. 320 pp. Tables, bibliography, index. $50.00 cloth. Though not entirely devoid of merits, this book is full of flaws, not the least of which are the questions Professor Park poses and the answers he proffers. Park poses his main question this way: "Protestant Christianity went through a very interesting metamorphosis [in (South) Korea], moving from a religion defiant toward both Confucianism and the colonial regime to an established religion. Its leaders were now [i.e., after 1919] conservative in tenor and sought comfort and security within the establishment. How can one explain this metamorphosis? Was it due to the church's conservative fundamentalist theology and doctrine, as some historians agree? Or was it a result of the transformation of Protestant Christian belief within its social and political context?" (pp. 5­6). The last sentence implies Park's answer and main argument. Fleshed out, his argument entails the following: Up to the end of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Korean Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Protestantism and Politics in Korea (review)

Korean Studies , Volume 27 (1)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1529
Publisher site
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Abstract

NOTE 1. The section on Yongbi 0ch'0n-ga is largely a condensed, word-for-word reprinting of Lee's earlier work contained in Celebration of Continuity: Themes in Classic East Asian Poetry (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1979), 11­33. Protestantism and Politics in Korea, by Chung-Shin Park. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2003. 320 pp. Tables, bibliography, index. $50.00 cloth. Though not entirely devoid of merits, this book is full of flaws, not the least of which are the questions Professor Park poses and the answers he proffers. Park poses his main question this way: "Protestant Christianity went through a very interesting metamorphosis [in (South) Korea], moving from a religion defiant toward both Confucianism and the colonial regime to an established religion. Its leaders were now [i.e., after 1919] conservative in tenor and sought comfort and security within the establishment. How can one explain this metamorphosis? Was it due to the church's conservative fundamentalist theology and doctrine, as some historians agree? Or was it a result of the transformation of Protestant Christian belief within its social and political context?" (pp. 5­6). The last sentence implies Park's answer and main argument. Fleshed out, his argument entails the following: Up to the end of

Journal

Korean StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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