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Possessive Nominalization in Kove

Possessive Nominalization in Kove Abstract: Kove, an Oceanic language of Papua New Guinea, has both direct and indirect possessive constructions. Indirect possession is expressed with two different possessive markers, a and le , depending upon the relation between the possessor and the possessee. These morphemes mark a distinction between active and passive possession. Active possession, where a possessor is the agent in the event or the notional subject of a nominalized verb, is expressed by le- type, while passive possession, where a possessor is the patient in the event or the notional direct object of a nominalized verb, is expressed by a . The le- type and the a- type markers cannot stand next to one another. However, they can cooccur at different structural levels if the erstwhile direct object is a lexical noun phrase, and the le- type marker has in its scope the possessive construction that contains the a- type marker. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Possessive Nominalization in Kove

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 48 (2) – Jan 28, 2009

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9421
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Abstract

Abstract: Kove, an Oceanic language of Papua New Guinea, has both direct and indirect possessive constructions. Indirect possession is expressed with two different possessive markers, a and le , depending upon the relation between the possessor and the possessee. These morphemes mark a distinction between active and passive possession. Active possession, where a possessor is the agent in the event or the notional subject of a nominalized verb, is expressed by le- type, while passive possession, where a possessor is the patient in the event or the notional direct object of a nominalized verb, is expressed by a . The le- type and the a- type markers cannot stand next to one another. However, they can cooccur at different structural levels if the erstwhile direct object is a lexical noun phrase, and the le- type marker has in its scope the possessive construction that contains the a- type marker.

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 28, 2009

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